Brazilian Air Force Squadron Helps with Patient Transportation

first_imgBy Dialogo January 31, 2013 I was Soldier and Corporal Dragonite, the armed forces have to work together with the state and national police forces, we are human beings with different technical training so that we can all perform our functions, what happens is that soldiers are prepared for war, but in those cases, since you ask for the public opinion, they are people with huge social responsibility and they are performing very well, with skills and technical courage because this starts from the moment one steps into the headquarters, already defending the country, police is at a provincial level, more concerned with civil life. greetings. Since January 27, the Brazilian Air Force’s Onça (Jaguar) Squadron (1°/15° GAV) has provided support to victims of the fire at the night club in Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul state. To date, the unit that operates the C-105 Amazonas airplanes performed four flights in the Santa Maria-Porto Alegre-Santa Maria route, and helped with the transfer of 25 high risk patients to the hospital in the capital. The Onça Squadron has two crews, including two doctors, and it transports patients around the clock. Seven advanced aerial support units were assembled in the airplane, composed of one doctor, one nurse, and one assistant. According to Captain José Ricardo Schwarz, commander of the airplane, this kind of mission requires certain precautions. “The airplane is prepared to fuel oxygen tanks, and test medical equipment so it is kept sterile. Therefore, we remain ready, until the last patient arrives. As soon as they are onboard we need to start the engines and the taxing process carefully and with agility”, he said. last_img read more

NASA Contributes to Helicopter Design

first_imgBy Dialogo September 10, 2013 NASA said that the Sea Knight CH-46 helicopter collision test was one of the most ambitious ones made at Langley Research Center (LaRC) in Hampton, Virginia. The cameras, which record 500 images per second, allowed researchers to figure out the way in which the fuselage would bend, brake or collapse on impact. NASA is collaborating with the U.S. Navy, Army and Federal Aviation Administration. In addition to improving security, engineers want to increase industrial knowledge and create more complete computer models that may be used to design better helicopters. NASA engineers dropped a helicopter’s fuselage from a height of 30 feet, as part of a project aimed at improving helicopter safety. The helicopter, loaded with three collision test dummies, was elevated 30 feet in the air and dropped to the ground at a speed of 30 miles per hour, while 40 high-speed cameras were recording the event that represented a severe, but not fatal, collision, according to engineers. The final goal is to contribute to the efficiency and speed of helicopters and other vertical launch vehicles, as well as making them quieter and less polluting.last_img read more

4th Fleet Commander Hosts Maritime Staff Talks with Chilean Navy

first_imgBy U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/U.S. Fourth Fleet September 18, 2020 Rear Admiral Don Gabrielson, commander of U.S. Naval Forces Southern Command/ U.S. Fourth Fleet, hosted delegates from the Chilean Navy for the annual Maritime Staff Talks (MST) July 22.MSTs support the U.S. global strategy by building and strengthening working relationships between the U.S. and partner nations and improving interoperability through face-to-face meetings. This year, in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the talks occurred virtually. Representatives from the Chilean Navy, U.S. Navy, U.S. Marine Corps, and the U.S. Coast Guard participated in the event.Rear Adm. Gabrielson, along with Major General Michael Fahey, commander of U.S. Marine Corps Forces South, led the U.S. delegation and Rear Admiral Pedro Abrego, commander of the Chilean Marine Corps, and Rear Admiral Jorge Parga, deputy chief of the Chilean Navy General Staff, led the Chilean delegation.“Our relationship from the United States’ perspective is very strong, it’s very deep, and getting better,” said Rear Adm. Gabrielson. “It is our job to make sure that the path forward is clear and meaningful.”MST topics included a review of upcoming scheduled war fighting operations and exercises over the next two years, and plans for education and training opportunities for Chilean personnel in the U.S., and U.S. personnel in Chile. Representatives also discussed COVID-19 lessons learned for both the United States and Chilean militaries.“It is no mystery that we are living through unprecedented times sailing uncharted waters. The COVID-19 pandemic is still floating and the full extent of its impact is [not] yet known,” said Rear Adm. Parga. “This is a truly global crisis.”The MST will serve as a comprehensive engagement venue for all bilateral maritime security cooperation activities. Over the past year, U.S. and Chilean navies have participated in many exercises including UNITAS and Fuerzas Comando. In addition, the U.S. is donating two field hospitals to Chile to support capacity for patients hospitalized due to the COVID-19 pandemic. All of these cooperative efforts enabled effective interoperability and aided each navy’s ability to work alongside one another.“Despite these unique circumstances I am very happy to see that we are finally able to hold this important bilateral meeting,” said Rear Adm. Parga. “The MST provides us with a unique opportunity to expand our existing partnership and achieve an even greater level of cooperation.”last_img read more

Two new board certification areas in the works

first_img Two new board certification areas in the works Mark D. Killian Managing Editor Proposals are now on the table to create two new areas of board certification — in administrative and governmental practice and subrogation law.“I think both of these are excellent areas for board certification,” said Judge Ralph Artigliere, chair of the Board of Legal Specialization and Education.Judge Artigliere said one of BSLE’s goals is to make board certification more available to Florida lawyers through the current certification areas and by creating new ones.“What we are trying to do is make sure as many people fit into the categories of specialization for certification as possible,” Artigliere said. “Unfortunately, despite 20 years of tremendous effort by the staff and the volunteers in the program, we still have a smaller percentage of lawyers certified than we want.”If ultimately approved, administrative and governmental practice and subrogation law would become the 21st and 22nd practice fields available to attorneys for board certification. More than 3,800 of the Bar’s 76,000 lawyers are now board certified. Administrative and Governmental Keith Rizzardi, immediate past chair of the Government Lawyer Section, said with the administrative procedures act becoming increasingly specialized, the field is now ripe for certification.“The Government Lawyers Section thinks the area of administrative practice and practicing before the government is one of the missing pieces of the certification puzzle,” said Rizzardi, who works for the Department of Justice in Washington, D.C. “There are an awful lot of folks out there who practice not civil trial, not appellate practice, but practice before administrative law judges and governmental tribunals.”Rizzardi said while local government law certification captures a certain percentage of public sector lawyers, those who are state and federal practitioners in the administrative arena “really don’t have anywhere to go.”He said the Government Lawyer Section has asked the Administrative Law Section and the Environmental and Land Use Law Section to review its proposal and also will work with the Local Government Law Section and Military Affairs Committee on the plan.Bobby Downie, chair of the Administrative Law Section, said his section is studying — and has made some suggested revisions — to the Government Lawyer Section’s effort.“We support a proposal for certification in administrative and governmental practice and right now we are working on the details,” Downie said. “We are working toward what we hope will be a good joint proposal.”Judge Artigliere said the BLSE doesn’t want new certification areas to detract from established ones and doesn’t think the administrative and governmental practice plan does.“I think there is a place for it, but we want to make sure we coordinate with existing certification areas,” Artigliere said.Rizzardi said the section hopes to get the proposed certification area before the Supreme Court by next January.“We are optimistic this is something that will benefit the members of the Bar and the public by giving them a chance to find attorneys who are acknowledged as experts in this area,” Rizzardi said. “We need as many people as possible to step up and say, ‘Hey, I would like the opportunity to get certified,’ and let the leaders in their sections know that they support the concept of certification.” Subrogation Law Miami’s George Cimballa, a staff counsel for Geico Insurance, was looking into getting a subrogation designation from the National Association of Subrogation Professionals, when he thought, “Wouldn’t it be more meaningful to have something like this from my state bar?”With that, he started calling other lawyers in the subrogation field, who indicated they, too, supported the concept.“I think subrogation lawyers and nonsubrogation lawyers understand that this is a real unique area of practice,” Cimballa said. “This is a good way to improve the practice of law in the state of Florida, and it would enhance the idea of subrogation as its own specialization to make the client more aware of the kind of work that is being done in this area.”Cimballa said drumming up support for a new subrogation law certification area presents a challenge since there is no subrogation law section to draw support from.“This is really a grass roots effort that relies on the enthusiasm of people that I meet to spread the word,” Cimballa said. “We are trying to build a database of interested lawyers to put them in touch with the Bar.”Judge Artigliere agreed, and said those interested in pursuing subrogation law certification will need to work hard to demonstrate there are enough lawyers interested in becoming certified in the field to justify the resources needed to support the certification area.“My personal view is that it is an ideal area if they can get the numbers of people interested.. . because it is a discrete area that has very good educational and testing possibilities,” Artigliere said.In order to demonstrate that commitment, Cimballa is asking those who have an interest in subrogation law certification to contact him at (305) 381-6073 or gcimballa@geico.com.Both proposed certification areas will be on the BLSE’s agenda for its March 10 meeting in Ft Lauderdale. For more information about board certification, or to comment on the proposals for administrative and governmental practice and subrogation law certification areas, contact Dawna Bicknell, director of Legal Specialization and Education, at dbicknell@flabar.org.A lawyer seeking to be certified must have practiced law for at least five years; show substantial involvement in the specific area of law during three of the last five years; show satisfactory continuing legal education; pass a certification examination; and be recognized as both competent and ethical through peer review. Only certified attorneys may identify themselves as “Florida Bar Board Certified,” as a “Specialist,” or as an “Expert.” March 1, 2005 Managing Editor Regular News Two new board certification areas in the workslast_img read more

Hillsborough Bar collects clothing for Iraqi children

first_imgHillsborough Bar collects clothing for Iraqi children When a Wesley Chapel attorney serving in Iraq with the U.S. Army Reserve contacted the Hillsborough County Bar in February to request assistance in providing clothing for the children of poor villagers, it didn’t take long for the bar members to step up to the task.Capt. Peter C. Richard wrote the HCBA describing the peril of the Kirkush, Iraq, children. They live in small mud homes adjacent to the brick factories where their parents work. Capt. Richard — a military advisor to the new Iraqi Army and deployed with the 98th Army Reserve Training Division from New York — explained that many of the children have no shoes and very little clothing and asked if members of the bar could collect used children’s clothing to ship it to him for distribution to the children.The HCBA established partnerships with several businesses and firms to collect the clothing and has sent more than 1,200 pounds of clothing to the children, including shoes and a few toys. The first shipment was received by Capt. Richard in late April.“It is a wonderful feeling to bring a little joy to the lives of people who normally have a very difficult existence,” Capt. Richard said in an e-mail to the HCBA. “This village lacks the most basic of human services. There is no running water, electric lines, sewer systems, telephones, or adequate roads. These people live in absolute squalor.”Richard said while the clothes were being distributed he was approached by a woman in a black Burka holding a child.“She asks me via my interpreter, who I will call Mohammed, if we have brought any doctors or medicine for her child,” Richard said. “While the women talks to me I look down at her young child and see a visibly sick young girl in front of me. There is little that I can do for the poor child during our visit, but I tell her that I will contact the American authorities to arrange a visit by a doctor or nurse in the near future. I explain to her that I cannot promise anything at this point but I would look into it. For a moment my heart sinks as I say goodbye to this women and turn to walk away. There are so many problems here in Iraq from 25 years of wars and opulent spending by Saddam Hussein.”Richard is married and has three sons. He only moved to Florida last July. Before comming to Florida he practiced in the Suffolk County Executive Office, specializing in municipal real estate and general litigation. In Iraq Richard is attached to the Coalition Military Assistance Training Team. His 10-man team consists of two majors, a captain, and seven senior sergeants who advise, train, and mentor an Iraqi battalion. “It is very interesting,” Richard said. “It is supposed to be a Special Forces mission but the Special Forces are stretched so thin that it was given to a Reserve Training Division.”The team advises the new Iraqi Army on legal matters including the Iraqi Code of Military Discipline and mentors the Iraqi soldiers on conducting combat operations. “I would like to take this opportunity to thank everyone in the Hillsborough Bar Association who donated these clothes, St. Jerome Catholic Church in Largo, and especially to Janet McGuire [public relations coordinator for the HCBA] who worked tirelessly to collect the clothes, box them, and ship them to Iraq. I wish you all could see the looks on the young faces as we handed out the clothes. Thank you!”Others assisting in the project include Meredith Wester of Mechanik Nuccio Williams Hearne & Wester; Caroline Black of Sessums, Mason & Black; Paul Hoffman of Hyde Park Paper; Modular Mailing; a women’s garden club in Lutz, and the U.S. Post Office. Hillsborough Bar collects clothing for Iraqi childrencenter_img July 1, 2005 Regular Newslast_img read more

Board makes budget amendments

first_imgBoard makes budget amendments The Bar Board of Governors approved several changes to the Bar’s 2005-06 budget at its August meeting, at the recommendation of the Budget Committee. Changes include:• A net increase in income of $245,625 from the $250 fee that will be charged to out-of-state lawyers when they come into Florida to handle an arbitration or appear pro hac vice. Budget Committee Chair Mayanne Downs said it is impossible to know for sure how much money will come from the fee, which is part of the new multijurisdictional practice rules, but the figure is a conservative estimate.• $84,496 to improve entertainment at the Bar’s Annual Meeting. Downs said the Annual Meeting Committee took steps to improve the entertainment at the 2005 convention and plans to continue that at the 2006 meeting as a way to attract more Bar members to the event.• $1,000 for the October 1 Second Annual Minority Mentoring Picnic. Bar President Alan Bookman praised the event as a good way to help minority law students find mentors.• $17,597 for the Bar’s Special Committee to Study Paralegal Regulation, set up at the suggestion of state legislators.• $7,765 to take over lawyer referral services in Okaloosa and Walton counties. Downs said an unknown amount is expected to be offset by revenues generated by referrals.• $25,000 to reprint 5,000 brochures explaining The Florida Bar and its services. The reprinting was recommended by the Communications Committee and endorsed by the Citizens Forum, which said the Bar should have a high quality publication to explain its mission.• $1,500 to pay for teleconferencing costs of the Bar’s Voluntary Bar Liaison Committee.• $50,000 from the Bar’s new program reserve, along with The Florida Bar Foundation, to pay for a statewide pro bono coordinator. (See story in the September 15 Bar News. Board makes budget amendmentscenter_img October 1, 2005 Regular Newslast_img read more

New Fox, Same Henhouse: Wall Street Takes Over LIBOR

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York There is a scene in The Godfather Part II when the Hyman Roth character, played by Lee Strasberg, admonishes Al Pacino’s Michael Corleone over the death of the character credited with building Las Vegas out of a “desert stopover for GIs.”Roth fixes his steely gaze angrily on Corleone and says, “That kid’s name was Moe Greene and the city he invented was Las Vegas. And there isn’t even a plaque or a signpost or a statue of him in that town.”The same could be said of Thomas Jasper, the architect of the biggest gambling venture ever invented: the swaps market.In her book The Futures, Forbes writer Emily Lambert describes how in 1981 Salomon Brothers “pulled an investment banker named Thomas Jasper out of a cloistered office and set him up on Salomon’s trading floor with its loud, swearing, cigar-smoking men.” Jasper’s job was to figure out how to turn a new type of banking agreement called an interest rate “swap” into a contract that could be traded on an exchange much like a commodity. By 1987 Salomon’s new product was ready for market, and as Lambert notes, “by that spring, there were $35 billion worth of bond futures contracts open at the Chicago Board of Trade, and there were $1 trillion worth of outstanding swaps transactions.”For Wall Street this was like graduating instantly from slots to craps.Twenty years later, unregulated swaps would be at the heart of the global financial meltdown and the very banks responsible for creating them would be considered “too big to fail.” A lethal mixture of deregulation, manipulation and greed would transform swaps—a type of investment known as a “derivative” in which two parties exchange risk with one another in a negotiated agreement—into opaque mega investments that many traded but few understood.Today, the global derivatives market is estimated to be somewhere around $1.2 quadrillion—more than 14 times larger than the world economy.After the crash in 2008, the whole world became acquainted with these investments and some of the toxic assets they were based on. Yet since the crash, and despite the best attempts on the part of regulators to get their arms around the world of derivatives, surprisingly little has changed in the way they are packaged, sold and regulated.By staying one step ahead of regulators, banks have continued to rake in historic profits. Bart Chilton, a commissioner at the Commodity Futures and Trading Commission (CFTC), is one of the U.S. regulators charged with implementing rules that would curb risky speculative behavior on the part of banks and protect American consumers. He expressed his irritation in an interview with the Press, saying, “The financial sector has made more profits every single quarter since the last quarter of 2008 than any sector of the economy by like a hundred billion dollars. So they crash the economy and still make more than anyone else.”Chilton points to the aggressive bank lobby against regulators as one major impediment to reform.“They have fuel-injected litigation against regulators,” he laments. “There are ten financial sector lobbyists for every single member of the House and Senate.”Despite this frustration, Chilton believes in the importance of speculators “in determining what the prices of things are, whether it’s a home mortgage or a gallon of milk.” Instead of squarely blaming the banks, he believes the question “is whether or not government has allowed too much leeway so that the markets have simply become a playground for speculators to roam and romp.”One of the most important determinants in pricing everything from mortgages to the multi-trillion-dollar derivatives market is the London inter-bank offered rate, better known as LIBOR. Barclays, the British banking giant, thrust LIBOR into the headlines last year when it was discovered that it was among a handful of banks found to be manipulating daily rates for its own benefit. The scandal rocked the banking sector and sent European regulators searching for a replacement to LIBOR or, at the very least, a new third-party administrator.Charting LIBOR’s new path was left to Martin Wheatley, who was head of the Financial Services Authority in the U.K. when the scandal broke. The recommendations, known as the Wheatley Review, included the formation of a panel charged with finding a new host for LIBOR that would restore confidence to the market and ensure transparency in the rate-setting process.In a twist even Michael Corleone would appreciate, the panel chose Wall Street.LIBOR: “A huge, hairy, honking deal.”Beginning in 2008, rumors began to circulate in the financial world that several of the London banks were involved in influencing the daily posted LIBOR rates. During a 2012 House Financial Services Committee investigation into the matter, Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner admitted to hearing the rumors while he served as head of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. In his testimony, Geithner said he attempted to warn U.K. and U.S. regulators but assumed they would “take responsibility for fixing this.”What the British and American governments knew and when they knew it unfortunately matters little at this juncture, as both have since levied financial penalties on the banks involved that amount to a slap on the wrist. What matters now is how rates are set going forward to ensure some degree of integrity. To understand how the Wheatley Review panel merely chose a new fox to guard the world’s financial henhouse, it’s important to understand how LIBOR is calculated and how much is riding on it.LIBOR rates are determined on a daily basis. According to an Economist article that details the scandal, “The dollar rate is fixed each day by taking estimates from a panel, currently comprising 18 banks, of what they think they would have to pay to borrow if they needed money.The top four and bottom four estimates are then discarded, and LIBOR is the average of those left.”Rates were submitted to the British Bankers Association (BBA), a nonprofit third-party administrator responsible for gathering and posting the data. In theory, the arms-length distance of a disinterested third party provided enough oversight and assurances to the market that rates were being determined fairly. Only the rates weren’t based upon actual market rates. Rather, they were estimates supplied by traders from Europe’s largest banks and therefore surprisingly susceptible to manipulation and, as it turns out, collusion.Traders were caught periodically manipulating these estimates in order to gain a trading advantage in the market and maximize profit on recent transactions. Moreover, because LIBOR is an indication of the perceived health of a financial institution, bankers had an added incentive to suppress rates to artificially illustrate confidence among their colleagues. In short, everyone was in on it. Because of the global credit crunch, few banks were actually lending large sums to other banks since both sides had cheap and easy access to government dollars to provide market liquidity. This reality made LIBOR even less realistic.Former Barclays president Bob Diamond initially responded to the scandal by admitting that while manipulation occurred, it didn’t happen “on the majority of days.” The Economist said Diamond’s response was “rather like an adulterer saying that he was faithful on most days.”Diamond subsequently resigned and so far three U.K. traders, Tom Hayes, Terry Farr and James Gilmour, were swept up in the LIBOR price-fixing scandal. According to the Financial Times, “Mr. Hayes, Mr. Farr and Mr. Gilmour are the only individuals to face U.K. criminal action to date in a global scandal that has seen three banks pay a combined $2.6bn in fines for attempting to manipulate interbank lending rates.”Many bankers have distanced themselves from the importance of the scandal by calling it a victimless crime. Bart Chilton had a choice expletive for this attitude, and then added, “If it’s a home loan mortgage, or a small business loan or a credit card bill, if you buy an automobile or if you have a student loan, about everything you purchase on credit is impacted by LIBOR. It’s a huge, hairy, honking deal. If somebody says it’s a victimless crime, I bet you it’s a banker.”Michael Greenberger, a professor at the University of Maryland, has been an outspoken critic of the way derivatives have been regulated for several years. (The Press first spoke with Greenberger for a 2008 cover story on the price manipulation of crude oil.) He weighed in on the Obama Administration’s reaction to the LIBOR price-fixing scandal saying, “This Justice Department is settling these LIBOR cases for what you and I would consider to be traffic tickets.”Considering who is about to be in charge of administering LIBOR, the Obama Administration and U.S. regulators might want to pay close attention to how the process unfolds.The Wheatley Review panel chose NYSE Euronext to step into the BBA’s role as administrator of LIBOR. On the surface, choosing the members of the New York Stock Exchange—one of the oldest and most trusted brand names in global finance—to oversee rate-setting seems like sound concept. Only the NYSE isn’t the clubby, self-governed body of individual members it once was. Today the exchange is a publicly traded, for-profit business whose shareholders include none other than the world’s biggest bank-holding companies. “They’re moving from a disinterested nonprofit that couldn’t do the job,” exclaims Greenberger, “to an interested for-profit. There’ll be less transparency I bet in the way that rates are set.”Chilton is equally apprehensive at the idea of the transition: “When there’s a profit motive, I think it’s always suspect. That’s why key benchmark rates like LIBOR in my view should be monitored or overseen by either a government entity, a quasi-government entity or a not-for-profit third party that doesn’t have a vested interest in what the rates should be.”How LIBOR will be determined in the future is still being hashed out. A spokesperson for NYSE Euronext declined to answer the Press’ questions on the record, instead directing us to their standard press release. Most observers agree, however, that the days of aggregating estimates should be a thing of the past.“These benchmarks need to be based upon actual trades,” says Chilton, “not a poll of what the money movers believe it should be.”As far as the bankers’ claims that price-fixing was a victimless crime, there are several municipalities that beg to disagree. The cities of Baltimore and Philadelphia, among others, have filed suit against several banks claiming severe financial injury due to LIBOR manipulation.“That’s the hidden story of Detroit,” says Greenberger. “Detroit got clobbered in the swaps market.”Greenberger also warns that “pensions are still in this market.” That’s a scary proposition considering the underlying risk and leverage that still exists off bank balance sheets.Eric Sumberg, the spokesman for the New York State Common Retirement Fund—the nation’s third-largest pension—says State Comptroller Tom DiNapoli is watching the LIBOR transition closely.“There have been some calls for moving from LIBOR’s banker’s poll to a rate-setting process that is more directly based on a broader universe of transactions and on actual market activity,” Sumberg wrote the Press in response to our inquiries. “Such a change over time could have the potential to improve transparency and integrity in rate-setting, but potential details of any such process have not yet emerged. We will continue to monitor developments in this area.”Yet even when the proposed rules are made public and the administration of LIBOR has fully transitioned, NYSE Euronext will still only be the titular head of LIBOR. The real force behind the market is neither in London nor New York. Atlanta, home of the Intercontinental Exchange (ICE), is the new financial capital of the world.ICE IN HIS VEINSTHE ICE MAN: Jeffrey Sprecher, Chairman andCEO of the Intercontinental Exchange (ICE).Photo taken from the2012 ICE annual report.Many of the toxic assets the public became aware of after the 2008 crash have worked their way through the system and been mostly written off by many of the largest financial institutions. Much of the credit for the industry’s stunning recovery belongs to the U.S. Federal Reserve’s low interest rate policy and aggressive liquidity practices known as quantitative easing. Much like the exuberance that preceded both the tech-bubble crash of 2000 and the mortgage-backed securities crash of 2008, a capital bubble established by the Federal Reserve is artificially propping up the market.Hedge funds and bank holding companies fueled their own recovery by using deposits, borrowed federal funds and leverage to drive the equity market to historic highs and post speculative profits in the derivatives market. And while the financial sector was scrambling to regain its footing, regulators in Washington, D.C., attempted to keep pace by passing reforms to prevent the next global financial crisis should the Federal Reserve change course and remove liquidity from the system while simultaneously allowing interest rates to gradually climb.In 2010, Congress passed the Dodd–Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act in an effort to curb speculation and create greater oversight in the financial sector. It was a monumental legislative task that has proven even more difficult to translate into regulatory policy. Regulators at the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Commodity Futures Trading Commission have been working against bank lobbyists and the fact that the markets are global and U.S. regulatory authority only reaches so far.To complicate matters further, banks have been busy changing the rules of engagement by shifting markets from classic bilateral swaps between parties to futures contracts, which are more standardized agreements traded on exchanges and therefore subject to greater regulatory scrutiny. In theory, exchange-traded derivatives will provide the transparency that regulators seek. In practice, however, this capital shift might simply move risky investments from the frying pan into the fire, as futures exchanges are global, meaning U.S. regulators must rely heavily on the voluntary cooperation of foreign exchanges.The one person set to benefit from this capital shift is Jeffrey Sprecher, founding chairman of the ICE. Though not a household name outside of investment circles, Sprecher has emerged as the unlikely king of the global trading exchange industry. In little more than a decade, he helped transform the commodities market from a $10 billion market to more than a half a trillion dollars, with the ICE being a huge beneficiary.The growth of trading on the ICE has been so explosive Sprecher is about to close on a deal to purchase the vaunted NYSE Euronext for $8.2 billion. The deal has already been approved by European regulators and awaits final approval in the U.S. Once completed, Sprecher will not only run the world’s most famous trading exchange; he will also extend his reach into the global derivatives market as the acquisition includes NYSE Liffe, one of the world’s largest derivatives trading desks.Nathaniel Popper’s front-page story in the business section of The New York Times on Jan. 20, 2013 pulls the veil back on Sprecher, the man, and describes how he grew a little-known Southern exchange into a juggernaut capable of purchasing NYSE. As Popper himself writes, “It sounds preposterous.” Given the inevitable capital shift sparked by U.S. regulators, Popper also notes that “Wall Street firms will have to move trading in many opaque financial products to exchanges, and ICE is in a perfect position to profit.”Popper’s piece brings forward a story that few people know. Most have no idea that trading exchanges are even for-profit businesses. And while he does a worthy job demystifying the business of exchanges, he overlooks the planet-sized regulatory loopholes that allowed Sprecher to convert a small energy futures trading exchange into a global exchange that is buying the most famous trading platform on Earth.To call Sprecher an opportunist would be technically accurate but cheap and intellectually dishonest. He understood the inevitability of electronic trading and the superior potential it held. But there’s a danger in spreading the accepted mythology of Jeff Sprecher and his plucky exchange. Behind his story is the familiar invisible hand of Wall Street.“The reason Sprecher has been so successful is he’s really representing all the major ‘too big to fail’ banks,” says Greenberger. “And they want him to succeed, and therefore he is succeeding.”Missing from the brief history of the ICE are the loopholes that gave it life and the ability to flourish beyond imagination. It was the oft-spoken of— but rarely understood—“Enron Loophole” that gave corporations the legal right to trade energy futures on exchanges such as the ICE even if the corporation itself was in the business of energy. The second loophole was a maneuver by the Bush Administration that granted the ICE foreign status as an exchange despite its being based in Atlanta. This initiated a massive shift of trading dollars, and influx of new ones, into the ICE for one reason: This singular move placed the ICE outside the purview of U.S. regulators like Chilton at the Commodities Futures and Trading Commission (CFTC). Essentially, corporations could now trade energy futures electronically through the ICE without oversight or disclosure.Moreover, the mere fact that the founding investors of the ICE are some of the world’s largest bank-holding companies, Morgan Stanley and Goldman Sachs in particular, speaks to how little transparency there truly is.This in no way takes away from Sprecher’s genius as a businessman. It simply illustrates how willfully ignorant we are to the business of Wall Street and therefore how frightfully far away we are from properly regulating it. Everything Sprecher has done is legal and ethical, to the extent there is an ethos on Wall Street. Where all of this hits home for the consumer is at places like the gas pump and the supermarket.Now it’s easier to place the LIBOR issue in its proper context. Almost every “too big to fail” bank has a significant ownership stake in both the ICE and NYSE Euronext, soon to be one entity. This combined entity will also soon control LIBOR, the world’s largest rate-setting mechanism. In trader’s parlance, this would be considered the perfect “corner.”But wait, there’s more. In the attempt to rein in speculation and manage risk in the marketplace, Dodd-Frank might have unintentionally become the gift that keeps on giving—to Sprecher.THE FUTURE OF FUTURESThe sheer size and complexity of the derivatives market overwhelm even the most interested parties—including Congress, regulators and bankers themselves—leaving average citizens utterly dumbfounded and sidelined. It’s little wonder. Banks that were too big to fail in 2008 are bigger today in 2013. The vast majority of the much-ballyhooed Dodd-Frank regulations have yet to take effect, and bank leverage is back at pre-crash levels.A former trader who worked in both New York and London recently told me, “At the end of the day, this market is running on the [Federal Reserve]. Once they pull out it’s all over. Cheap money, loads of people making loads of money, but no lessons learned.”Derivatives themselves aren’t nearly as difficult to understand as the markets they trade in. They are essentially risk transfer agreements between two parties, a way to hedge investments. The word ‘derivative’ refers to the fact that the agreement derives value from other investments: a bet as to how the original investment would perform. It’s helpful to once again employ the casino analogy.Ten random players approach the roulette table and lay down $100 worth of chips on various numbers. Each individual gambler is making a bet, or an investment, collectively totaling $1,000.Now imagine that another gambler watching the action on the roulette table calls his or her bookie and places a bet on the outcome of their total wagers when the wheel stops spinning. Having sized up the situation, the gambler predicts that overall this group will win and walk away with $1,100. But in order for this bet to be placed, someone else has to take the action and bet the group will lose $100, leaving them with $900. Before the ball drops on the number, the bookie connects the two outside gamblers and creates a new bet. This bet functions as the derivative investment because even though they’re not actually playing the game, they have a stake in the outcome.In the real world of investing, the bookie is a trader and the gambler taking the action from the outside is a speculator. Sounds nefarious, but in reality, these transactions are essential to providing market stability.“If we didn’t have speculators,” says Chilton, the CFTC commissioner, “consumers would pay disproportionate prices.”There are three classic types of derivatives, all of which Chilton and the CFTC have been trying to rein in well before the crash introduced the world to this type of investment. All three involve counterparties, which trade these investments either directly or through exchanges.But the differences between the three types of derivatives are diminishing. The first type of derivative is commonly referred to as a “swap.” This is where two parties exchange risk with one another in a negotiated agreement. In the United States, these have traditionally been deals between banks that fall under the purview of the SEC. The other two types of derivatives, futures and cleared derivatives, are negotiated similarly but must be listed and cleared on exchanges.The CFTC and other regulators have long argued that these investments are similar in nature and should therefore be consistently regulated with complete transparency. With the exception of swaps, the investment created at Salomon Brothers in the 1980s, this was historically the case. But despite the similarity between swaps and other types of cleared derivatives, regulators allowed swaps to be treated as banking instruments that were held “off balance sheet.” Over the next two decades a flurry of deregulation and the growth of global trading reduced the transparency of derivatives trading and increased the size of the market dramatically.The Dodd-Frank regulations were designed to put an end to this practice by requiring anyone who deals in large amounts of swaps to register as a swaps dealer and clear their trades through an exchange. Yet CNBC’s John Carney believes the new swaps regulations have already created a “flight to futures” from swaps, an unintended consequence of Dodd-Frank that will end up with a “world with less collateral and less capital, less transparency, less investor protection, more concentration of risk, and a huge unanticipated market transformation.”In other words, the ICE will likely be the greatest beneficiary of Dodd-Frank.Nevertheless, Chilton believes that there will still be “trillions, tens of trillions if not hundreds of trillions of swaps that will be traded in the U.S. and worldwide that will be regulated and have the light of day cast upon them.”For his part, Greenberger agrees U.S. regulators are beginning to get a handle on the markets but thinks inordinate risk is still present in the market. He calls the original Dodd-Frank a “Rube Goldberg system” that was “prospective in nature. There’s still trillions of dollars of swaps that are operating in an unregulated environment.”The world will have to hold its breath until these unregulated swaps run their course and settle in the global marketplace. Intelligent reforms such as margin and capital requirements, position limits and cross-border coordination with respect to regulation are indeed around the corner. These reforms essentially mandate that everyone involved in trading these agreements has enough money to cover potential losses and plays by the same set of rules.“Ultimately we will have position limits,” Chilton believes. “I would be surprised if they weren’t in place by the end of the year.”Greenberger also believes the world will begin to recognize universal standards, saying: “The CFTC has made it clear that for futures the foreign exchanges have to comply with U.S. rules.”Sign from the Occupy Wall Street encampment at Zuccotti Park in Manhattan. Protests over the Wall Street bank bailout raged throughout the nation and yet little has changed since Occupy.Even still, he worries that “this international guidance is a roadmap for banks to avoid Dodd Frank. Just trade in foreign subsidiaries.”Chilton takes a more sanguine view on immediate concerns such as transparency, working with his European counterparts and the future of LIBOR, but he worries more about the things he cannot see.“I feel like we’re going to get things done on capital requirements and on cross-border stuff so that other regulators come to where we are,” says Chilton. “But there’s a bunch of new things that are around the corner that we can’t see.”He cites high-speed trading computers that he calls “cheetah traders” as an example of the unknown. “The cheetah traders, the high-frequency traders, are proliferating. They’re 30 to 50 percent of markets on average but during feeding frenzy time, cheetahs can be up to 70 or 80 percent of the market. There’s not one single word in the Dodd Frank legislation that deals with high-frequency trading. Not one word.”Once again, pulling the strings behind this unseen phenomenon is Sprecher, the man responsible for making high-frequency trading what it is today.Thomas Jasper will likely never get that plaque for inventing the investment world’s biggest game of chance. On a positive note, however, he’s alive, well and wealthy, unlike Moe Greene, who infamously took a bullet through the eye. But there are better-than-even odds that a statue of Jeff Sprecher will someday be erected on Wall Street. Or, at the very least, downtown Atlanta.last_img read more

Startup Tech Firms Find New Space in Huntington

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone, center, cuts the ribbon at LaunchPad Huntington on Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2014. (Photo credit: Phil Rugile) Long Island’s fledgling technology industry took another step forward with the opening this week of a new space to grow companies called LaunchPad Huntington on Main Street in the heart of that village’s downtown.The 8,500-square-foot “incubator,” in partnership with a similar operation in Mineola, will provide desks, offices and two conference rooms for entrepreneurs with the goal of creating a collegial working environment that will foster creativity, innovation and productivity. Not to mention, eventually turn a profit and change the world, albeit one online platform at a time.“The programs will help carry the impact of the facility far beyond just the companies located in the facility,” LaunchPad Long Island founder Andrew Hazen said in a statement. “We will be helping startups throughout the region gain access to the resources they need to succeed.”Thanks to $140,000 in tax breaks from Suffolk County, the young companies selected for the new space won’t have to raise a huge amount of capital initially to stay afloat. But they do have to pass muster in order to get seed money. Once they’re in the subsidized space, where a desk starts at $299 a month, they receive mentoring, get plugged into networking events and gain access to more capital. And if they’re successful, they are expected to outgrow the incubator and move on.One of the anchor tenants of the new space, Tyler Roye, CEO of eGifter, an electronic gift-card company, was instrumental in getting this project off the ground. Roye said he was glad to partner with Hazen to make this Huntington work space possible.“We wanted to move eGifter into the village,” Roye said, “and saw the opportunity to do something on a larger scale, helping Andrew to extend the LaunchPad brand and programs while also helping to build the local startup ecosystem.”Joining Roye’s company in the opening round will be Flight Partners, Verify Anybody, MyWorkster, TalentBrowser and Immersive Ubiquity. LaunchPad Huntington hopes to select another three to five startups to fill the current roster.Nassau County Executive Ed Mangano was on hand when the first LaunchPad took off in Mineola last fall, so it was only appropriate that Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone braved a blustery winter’s day to come indoors to the incubator and cut the ribbon in the opening ceremony. He was joined by Huntington Councilman Mark Cuthbertson and Legis. William Spencer (D-Huntington) as well as Anthony Manetta, CEO and executive director of the Suffolk Industrial Development Agency.This incubator initiative comes under the umbrella of Accelerate Long Island, a public-private partnership, overseen by Executive Director Mark Lesko, the former Brookhaven Town supervisor.“Launchpad Huntington will be the center of entrepreneurial activity on Long Island,” said Lesko in a statement. “We have been waiting for a space like Launchpad Huntington for startups for a very long time. I want to congratulate Tyler Roye, CEO of eGifter, who has emerged as a leader of the Long Island entrepreneurial ecosystem.  His continued success with eGifter will have a positive impact on Long Island’s future as a hub for high-tech startups.”last_img read more

Cops Probe Threatening Anti-Gay Letters to GLBT Network CEO

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Local authorities are seeking the public’s help in identifying the author of a hate-filled, anti-gay letter sent to the CEO of the Long Island GLBT Network—the third such letter his group has received in the last 18 months.The most recent letter—sent to two of the GLBT Network’s community centers in Woodbury and Bay Shore—threatened violence against the group’s CEO, David Kilmnick, and was received one day after a proposal for a gay-friendly senior housing facility in Bay Shore was announced.The three-paragraph letter, typed in all capital letters, is laced with obscenities and hateful remarks about sex acts. It begins with a sarcastic apology—“SORRY WE COULD NOT BLOW YOUR ASS AWAY UP IN HUNTINGTON BACK IN THE SPRING” (during a gay pride parade)—and ends by threatening to “eliminate” Kilmnick and the GLBT Network’s three community centers. It also threatens to eventually burn the not-yet-approved senior housing facility, which the author calls a “SAFEHOUSE,” to the ground.The sender also takes a shot at Newsday, calling it a “FAG-LOVING” newspaper for publishing “YOUR UNBELIEVABLE GAY MUG IN THE PAPER.”“WELL GUESS WHAT…..IT WON’T BE SAFE,” the author says of the 55-room proposed rental property, which a developer plans to build on a depressed stretch of Park Avenue. “YOU ARE NOT SAFE….YOU ARE BEING TRACKED…IT IS JUST A MATTER OF TIME UNTIL THE RIGHT MOMENTS ARRIVE TO ELIMINATE YOU AND YOUR LOCATIONS, AND THE ‘SAFEHOUSE’ IS BURNED TO THE GROUND.”Kilmnick, in a phone interview Friday, said his group received similar letters in June 2013 and another exactly one year later to coincide with an annual LGBT pride parade in Huntington. Both letters were reported to police.He said the letters have grown angrier in tone since.“They all had the same tone in terms of its hatefulness and making it clear that they do not like gay people and they certainly don’t like that we’re out there so visible,” Kilmnick said.“It’s quite disturbing and unnerving,” he added, “and it’s also a wake up call for all of us not to be complacent with all the gains we’ve had with equality in the community.”He said he’s now more aware of his surroundings, occasionally finding himself looking around for anyone who may have plans to harm him. Police have increased patrols around the community centers in Bay Shore, Woodbury and Sag Harbor, as well as around his home, he said. Despite the threats, Kilmnick stressed that the GLBT Network’s buildings are safe.“It’s not going to deter me or us from doing what we need to do,” he said.While discussing the letters to a reporter, Suffolk County police emailed a press release asking anyone with information about the letters to contact the Hate Crimes Unit at 631-852-6181 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-220-TIPS.“What I’m hoping, actually, is…that the person may brag about it to someone, and it’s real important for people to say something if they hear someone bragging about this,” Kilmnick urged. “This isn’t something that should be taken lightly.”last_img read more

Long Island Press 2015 High School Journalism Awards Honor Outstanding High School Students

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York The 2015 Long Island Press High School Journalism Awards Program was a resounding success yet again, culminating in its annual awards gala May 27 at Hofstra University’s John Cranford Adams Playhouse attended by hundreds of high school students, faculty and parents from across Long Island.It was a celebration that will undoubtedly be remembered for a long, long time.The annual awards competition and gala, now in its eighth year, recognizes outstanding high school journalism in print, video and online, including reporting, writing, design, artwork and illustration across more than 100 individual categories, ranging from “Best Arts Feature” to Best School Spirit Video.” Special awards are also presented for Story of the Year, Student Journalist of the Year, Advisor of the Year and Newspaper of the Year.With nearly 1,600 entries from more than two dozen high schools throughout Nassau and Suffolk, the 2015 contest was unprecedented in its scope and quality of submissions. As always, Long Island Press staffers spent weeks judging these entries and were impressed by the students’ exceptional depth and caliber of work.All Smiles: (L-R) Bay Shore High School ‘Maroon Echo’ Advisor Walt Fishon, Massapequa High School ‘The Chief’ Advisor Elyn Coyle, Commack High School ‘The Courant’ Advisor Christina Semple and New Hyde Park Memorial High School ‘The Chariot’ Advisor Mike Stencel were all crowned Advisors of the Year at the 2015 Long Island Press High School Journalism Awards Gala at Hofstra University on May 27, 2015! CLICK HERE TO VIEW PICTURES FROM THE 2015 LONG ISLAND PRESS HIGH SCHOOL JOURNALISM AWARDS GALA AT HOFSTRA UNIVERSITY!“Submissions ran the gamut—from colorful arts and entertainment coverage and insightful enterprise and investigative articles to emotionally moving first-person accounts of everything from protesting war in the Middle East to what it’s like to come face-to-face with racism,” wrote Press/Morey Publishing Editor in Chief Christopher Twarowski in a special letter to students published within a program booklet distributed at the event. “Students provided in-depth analysis of such hot-button national issues as Common Core and police brutality to First Amendment rights and terrorism. They wrote about the environment, school budgets, pay equality, standardized testing, sexism and transgender rights. They wrote about government, sports, fashion. They wrote about food, technology, health, humor, the prom and war.”“From breathtaking photo spreads and smart, gripping headlines to elements such as layout, flow, placement of graphics and artwork, use of pull-quotes and headlines—entrants in the design categories were likewise impressive,” he continued. “So were students’ video submissions, which included inspirational recoveries from rare diseases, impressive school spirit montages and introspective vignettes about everyday school life.”“Of course, all of these topics, no matter how far-reaching, have local consequences and ramifications, and students did an outstanding job documenting them,” added Twarowski. “Their coverage of the Opt-Out movement, school speed cameras and the high-stress environment consuming students throughout all grade levels added perspectives all-too-easily ignored by some local news outlets.“Journalism is a challenging and rewarding field,” wrote Evan Cornog, Ph.D., dean of The Lawrence Herbert School of Communication at Hofstra University in another letter to students within the booklet. “Challenging because it is hard to root out the truth, and when you succeed there will always be some who will not thank you; rewarding because you have the power to bring injustices to light and help build a better world.”The gala kicked off with an introduction from Press/Morey Publishing Associate Publisher Beverly Fortune, followed by opening remarks by Press Publisher Jed Morey and a keynote address from Dean Cornog.The program and this magnificent awards celebration, in which students from throughout the participating schools proudly walked onstage to accept their various awards and pose for photographs with fellow classmates, winners and advisors, would have not been possible, of course, without the continued tremendous support of its chief sponsor, Hofstra University and The Lawrence Herbert School of Communication.The annual awards gala was once again emceed by award-winning journalist, broadcaster, Press Club of Long Island board member and Long Island Press High School Awards Program Coordinator (and all-around superhero) David North, who interspersed the hundreds of students’ names and their respective honors with knee-slapping jokes and observations. His infectious charm, passion and wit kept the night moving along smoothly, occasionally handing the microphone over to a host of Press staffers for truly moving remarks.Night To Remember: (L-R) Long Island Press Associate Publisher Beverly Fortune, High School Journalism Awards Program Coordinator (broadcaster, emcee and all-around superhero) David North, and Hofstra University’s Lawrence Herbert School of Communication Dean Evan Cornog were among the all-star speakers and presenters at the 2015 Long Island Press High School Journalism Awards Gala at Hofstra University on May 27, 2015! REPORTING & WRITING AWARDSANDREA REBELLO COMMUNITY SERVICE AWARD1. Sanskriti BimalMineola High School, The Question Mark“Advocating Education For The Underprivileged Girl Child”2. Steven MolinaBellport High School, The Clipper“Students Can Make A Difference”3. Alexandra DoulosMassapequa High School, The Chief“The Art Of Affability: Massapequa Installs New ‘Koda Benches’”Honorable Mention. Kelly ChuW.T. Clarke High School, Vanguard“Dots On Our Doors”ARTS FEATURE1. Debbie SoufianGreat Neck North High School, Guide Post“The Art-icle”2. Thomas FitzgeraldNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Kanye West – The Ascension Of Yeezus”3. Rohit BachaniW.T. Clarke High School, Vanguard“Go-Fish!”ARTS REVIEW – THEATER1. Kaitlyn LuceyMassapequa High School, The Chief“My Fair Lady Review”2. Arianne RogersSmithtown High School East, The Matador“Les Miz: Back In Show Biz”3. Giavanna TimsBellport High School, The Clipper“Everything’s Coming Up Gypsy”ARTS REVIEW – ART1. Debbie SoufianGreat Neck North High School, Guide Post“The Art-icle”2. Sabrina WongJericho High School, JerEcho“Scholastic Art and Writing 2015”3. Kennedy RoseBellport High School, The Clipper“Bellport Students Shine At Recent Art Shows”ARTS REVIEW – VIDEO GAMES1. Claire NuñezSmithtown High School East, The Matador“Virtually Living The Sim-ple Life”2. Catherine SangiovanniCommack High School, The Courant“Game on: Xbox One Vs. PlayStation 4”ARTS REVIEW – BOOK REVIEW1. Cassie SlibaBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Teen Heroes Make Dystopian YA Big”2. Alasia PalmerBellport High School, The Clipper“Series Review: Heroes Of Olympus”3. Nelson Gomez and Nicholas PetrilloMassapequa High School, The Chief“New Harper Lee Novel To Be Released For A New Century”ARTS REVIEW – LOCAL MUSIC1. Tali Zingman and Elaine ChenLynbrook High School, Horizon“A Lynbrook Voice On His Way To ‘The Voice’”2. Sydney Sirota“Commack High School, The Courant“#MACKAPELLA Takeover”3. Tim KeuchlerMassapequa High School, The Chief“Aspiring Musician Rebecca White Takes Center Stage”ARTS REVIEW – NATIONAL MUSIC1. Alejandro SerranoBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Groove To The Guru, But Quickly”2. Kennedy RoseBellport High School, The Clipper“Concert Review: Monumentour”3. Nia TuckerBellport High School, The Clipper“Drake Mixtape Is Fire?”ARTS REVIEW – ALBUM1. Elma ThorarinssonNorth Shore High School, Viking View“Everything Is Still In Transit”2. Rebecca Simon and Evan SilveraJericho High School, JerEcho“‘Hozier’ Album Review”3. Tyler BaronNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Kendrick Spits Fire On Charts”ARTS REVIEW – FILM1. Shanon ThomasNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“A Timely Cry For Justice”2. Shaheer Ilyas and Roby DanielNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Wrestling With Demons”3. Abha JapiNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Students Can’t Get Enough Of The DUFF”ARTS REVIEW — TV1. Kaylie FelsbergBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Break Out Laughing Over ‘Kimmy Schmidt’2. Sotiris GeorgakopoulousSmithtown High School East, The Matador“ABC’s Killer New Show”3. Gabby DeVeglioEast Islip High School, The Broadcaster“American Horror Story: Season 4: Freak Show”ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT1. Mikaela AdwarJericho High School, JerEcho“Star Struck With ‘The Fault In Our Stars’”2. Gregory KothesakisNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Netflix Takes The House With New Season”3. Kennedy RoseBellport High School, The Clipper“Concert Review: Monumentour”AURA DIAZ AWARD / FIRST PERSON1. Sharon AhmedBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Middle East Atrocities Spur Student To Action”2. Christopher SumanoEast Islip High School, The Broadcaster“True Colors Of Racism in America”3. Olivia PumiliaShoreham-Wading River High School, Wildcat Pause“From Student To Jail Bird: My Trip To The County Jail”BUSINESS1. Erin-Marie DeytiquezW.T. Clarke High School, Vanguard“Watch Your Dietect!”2. Nicholas CristofariNorth Shore High School, Viking View“Apple On A Diet: How Thin Can It Get?”3. Gabby GartenJericho High School, JerEcho“Students Race To Use Uber”COLUMN – SCHOOL1. Nelson GomezMassapequa High School, The Chief“Commissioner King Resigns, Leaving Behind Uncertain Future”2. Nelson GomezMassapequa High School, The Chief“District Debate Shifts From Budget to Declining Enrollment”3. Matthew WiglerGreat Neck North High School, Guide Post“S.O. What’s Happening?”COLUMN – GENERAL1. Binita ShahW.T. Clarke High School, Vanguard“Binita’s Bollywood Binge”2. Sally BishopGreat Neck North High School, Guide Post“Sincerely, Sally”3. Meg TohillEast Islip High School, The Broadcaster“Springing Into 2015”COMMUNITY SERVICE1. Victoria PonzoNorth Shore High School, Viking View“The ‘Ice-Bucket’ Comparison?”2. Ashley Dominquez-BonillaFreeport High School, Flashings“Ripples Of Hope Change The World”3. Judy MermelsteinCommack High School, The Courant“Helping The Community ‘Grow’”Deadline / Breaking NewsDEADLINE/BREAKING NEWS1. Gabriel AjzenmanLynbrook High School, Horizon“Ebola Epidemic Scares America”2. David MarquesMassapequa High School, The Chief“Nassau Cuts School Zone Speed Cameras; Lights Dim On Plan”3. Ava GerardiShoreham-Wading River High School, Wildcat Pause“Locker Move Frustrating”EDITORIAL1. Gibran Caroline BoyceHalf Hollow Hills High School East, Thunderbird“Three High School Football Teams Deal With Tragedy”2. Maroon Echo StaffBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Lack Of Diversity In AP/IB Classes Should Be Addressed”3. Natalie Metaxas and Ashley RadparvarGreat Neck North High School, Guide Post“S.O.S. Stamp Put Social Media 2014”EDITORIAL – NATIONAL/INTERNATIONAL1. Matthew SwickleJericho High School, JerEcho“Feelings Of Hope For Greece”2. Pavithran RavindranW.T. Clarke High School, Vanguard“Je Suis Charlie”3. Sotiris GeorgakopoulosSmithtown High School East, The Matador“CIA’s Inhumane Torture Needs To Stop”EDITORIAL – GENERAL1. Brandan LawrenceMassapequa High School, The Chief“Pressure For Perfection In Women Simply Artificial”2. Gibran BoyceHalf Hollow Hills High School East, Thunderbird“From Tragedy To Triumph”3. Camryn GarrettBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“When Making A Film, Remember I Exist, Too”EDUCATION – NATIONAL ISSUES1. Lily SaeliSouthold High School, The Sentinel“Common Core Commotion”2. Alechia CacaceBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Recent Grads Report High School Students Are Prepped For College”3. Alexandra DoulosMassapequa High School, The Chief“The (Once Again) Redesigned SAT: What You Need To Know”EDUCATION – LOCAL ISSUES1. Shaheer Ilyas and Roby DanielNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“SFT Contract Negotiations Continue”2. Teena ThomasNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“A Feud Worth Fighting For”3. Alejandro SerranoBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“District Wants Albany To Reconsider Field Tests”ENERGY REPORTING1. Sarah RiordanCommack High School, The Courant“Unlikely Union: Food And Genetics”2. Ariel AvgiNorth Shore High School, Viking View“The Weather. Brought To You By N.S.H.S.?”ENTERTAINMENT & LIFESTYLE1. Nicole LamannaNorth Shore High School, Viking View“Writers, Writers Everywhere”2. Daisy Rymer and Althea MignoneSouthold High School, The Sentinel“Netflix Hidden Gems”3. Sakshi SharmaHalf Hollow Hills High School East, Thunderbird“BMWi8”ENVIRONMENTAL STORY1. Andrea ParedesBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“You Better Bee-Lieve It: Bee Population Is Declining”2. Mary BertschiSouthold High School, The Sentinel“Gardening: A Natural Alternative”3. Mary BertschiSouthold High School, The Sentinel“Another Inconvenient Truth”FASHION FEATURE1. Rachel LeinerCalhoun High School, Hoofbeats“Fashion And Movies: A Heavenly Match”2. Katie McMahonMassapequa High School, The Chief“Haute or Horrible? The Question of Couture Raises Discussion”3. Jasmine BurgosLynbrook High School, Horizon“The Fashion Superbowl”FEATURE – GENERAL1. Elise AmbosBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Frazzled”2. Sarah QadirCommack High School, The Courant“Hometown Hero”3. Ariel AvgiNorth Shore High School, Viking View“Easy As Pie: The American Road Test”FEATURE – LOCAL1. Brianna MinneciShoreham-Wading River High School, Wildcat Pause“Fall Farming Causes Frenzy”2. Nicole BienLynbrook High School, Horizon“This Could Be YOUtube”3. Jaclyn AngeloMassapequa High School, The Chief“Student Shows Community That ‘Everybody Deserves Music’”FOOD – COMMENTARY1. Jenna BarboneSmithtown High School East, The Matador“Goodbye Junk Food And Hello Healthy Eating”2. Camila Cabrera SalazarEast Islip High School, The Broadcaster“Running On Dunkin’”3. Lauren PellerHalf Hollow Hills High School East, Thunderbird“‘Eggs-Ploring’ New Cholesterol Findings”FOOD – RESTAURANT REVIEW1. Jasmine GarciaNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Brewing Up A Conversation”2. Megan Konfino and Marlie AllenCommack High School, The Courant“Sushi Standoff”3. Alexandra Kessel and Brianna MinneciShoreham-Wading River High School, Wildcat Pause“Local Tastes Of Mexico”FORMAT BUSTER1. Maroon Echo StaffBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Spanish Pages”2. Binita Shah and Kevin WangW.T. Clarke High School, Vanguard“Where Do You Fit In?”3. Karen Papazian and Pavithran RavindranW.T. Clarke High School, Vanguard“Mr. Feggeler: Taking The Midwest By Storm!”FIRST AMENDMENT/FREEDOM OF SPEECH AWARD1. Madison FlotteronBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“To Stand Or Not To Stand…”2. Carolyn RogersShoreham-Wading River High School, Wildcat Pause“The Fight For Student Rights Continues”3. Gianna BarberiaHalf Hollow Hills High School West, The Roundup“Earning Equality: Let America Be America Again”GOVERNMENT – LOCAL1. Katie KontinoCommack High School, The Courant“Testing A New Method”2. Carly Lapidus and Nikki BerrinJericho High School, JerEcho“Where Did All The Baked Goods Go?”3. Keva LiGreat Neck North High School, The Guide Post“Grading The Teachers”GOVERNMENT – NATIONAL1. Emma La ReddolaCommack High School, The Courant“’Executive Order’ Orders Up Controversy”2. Alechia CacaceBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Fight Against ISIS Becomes Global”3. Claire NunezSmithtown High School East, The Matador“Foreign Relations: Close But No Cuban Cigar—Yet”HEADLINE – ENTERTAINMENT1. Sam NewmanJericho High School, JerEchoShrek Is An Ogre-Sized Success”2. Lester NetsNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“1989 Swiftly Rises To The Top”3. Amber BarneyBellport High School, The Clipper“Yoga Pants: A Boy’s Worst Nightmare”HEADLINE – EDITORIAL 1. Katie KonfinoCommack High School, The Courant“A Broken World”2. Shaheer IlyasNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“To Opt-out or Not To Opt-Out, That Is The Standardized Question”3. Gianna BarberiaHalf Hollow Hills High School West, The Roundup“Earning Equality: Let America Be America Again”HUMOR1. Gregory QuistSouthold High School, The Sentinel“Dale’s Dilemma”2. Kennedy RoseBellport High School, The Clipper“Clipper Prints Final Issue Ever”3. Josalie QuiwaHigh Hollow Hills High School West, The Roundup“Pedals Over Pastries”IN-DEPTH REPORTING1. Alejandro SerranoBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Non-Native Students Make Journey For Better Education, Life”2. Amber FarooqBay Shore High Shore, Maroon Echo“Despite Mirroring National Stats, AP/IB Lack Diversity Of School”3. Katie KonfinoCommack High School, The Courant“The 21st Century Dilemma”INFORMATIONAL FEATURE1. Alejandro SerranoBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Killing Oneself Now The Leading Cause Of Death Due To Injury”2. Alexandra NolanJericho High School, JerEcho“Students’ Opinions Are Sound On Texting And Driving”3. Evan HochhauserHalf Hollow Hills High School West, The Roundup“Paying For College Before You Can Even Start”ROBERT W. GREENE INVESTIGATIVE / ENTERPRISE REPORTING AWARD1. Alexandra EichensteinHalf Hollow Hills High School West, The Roundup“The Cheating Epidemic And What We’re (Not) Doing To Stop It”2. Amber FarooqBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Genetically Modified Organisms Creeping Way Into School Menu”3. Shaheer Ilyas and Roby DanielNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“SFT Contract Negotiations Continue”Honorable Mention. Julia SaccamanoSouthold High School, The Sentinel“It’s All About The Price Tag: The Unexpected Cost Of Your Future”MEDIA COLUMN1. Michelle LuJericho High School, JerEcho“YouTubers Succeed Beyond YouTube”2. Jenna BarboneSmithtown High School East, The Matador“iCloud Hacker Exposes Celebrities”NEWS STORY1. David MarquesMassapequa High School, The Chief“Too Few ‘Just Say No,’ LI Drug Problem Continues To Escalate”2. Katie KonfinoCommack High School, The Courant“The 21st Century Dilemma”3. Shaheer Iylas and Roby DanielNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“SFT Contract Negotiations Continue”OPINION – GENERAL1. Kevin McCannNorth Shore High School, Viking View“Origins Of Post-Modern Life”2. Kennedy RoseBellport High School, The Clipper“I Need A Hero”3. Andrew ScialloEast Islip High School, The Broadcaster“State Testing Could Determine Your Future”OPINION PIECE – NATIONAL1. Megan RodriguezW.T. Clarke High School, Vanguard“The Cost Of National Security”2. Christopher SumanoEast Islip High School, The Broadcaster“True Colors Of Racism”3. Jack LockwoodNorth Shore High School, Viking View“Gimme Three (Over) Steps”OPINION – POP CULTURE1. Collin GiulaniHalf Hollow Hills High School East, Thunderbird“Two Directions”2. Camila CabreraEast Islip High School, The Broadcaster“Entertainment Or Harassment?”3. Shannon Thomas and Fabiha KhalidNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Who’s The Boss?”OPINION PIECE – SCHOOL1. Alexandra EichensteinHalf Hollow Hills High School West, The Roundup“The Cheating Epidemic And What We’re (Not) Doing To Stop It”2. Jenna RudolfskyCalhoun High School, Hoofbeats“BYOI: Bring Your Own Ink”3. Mary DzyrNorth Shore High School, Viking View“What About US?”POLITICAL – LOCAL FEATURE 1. Stephanie ZelenetzNorth Shore High School, Viking View“The Ebola Hysteria Continues…On Long Island?”2. Marie Allen and Megan KonfinoCommack High School, The Courant“Keeping It On Long Island”3. Sarah QadirCommack High School, The Courant“Hometown Hero”POLITICAL – NATIONAL FEATURE 1. Gianna BarberiaHalf Hollow Hills High School West, The Roundup“Earning Equality: Let America Be America Again”2. Matthew Sheahan and Andre De LeonW.T. Clarke High School, Vanguard“ISIS: A Global Threat”3. Dorian PietraruNorth Shore High School, Viking View“A Chance For The Middle East”PROFILE1. Christina PanouisNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Thumbs Up For YasTube”2. Vishruth GirishNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot 
“All-Scrub To All-County”3. Teena ThomasNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The ChariotBrooke Cradin: Broadway Bound BiologistQ&A1. Ashley RadparvarGreat Neck North High School, Guide Post“Interview With Nobel Prize Winner – David Baltimore”2. Katie BurkeEast Islip High School, The Broadcaster“If You Could Take One Celebrity To Prom, Who Would It Be And Why?”3. Dennis Tavares and Matt WenkEast Islip High School, The Broadcaster“Ask Derek”Q&A – SCHOOL1. Jessica CarusoSmithtown East, The Matador“East Student’s East Asian Experience”2. Katie BurkeEast Islip High School, The Broadcaster“Who is One Teacher That Has Influenced Your Life and Why?”3. Karen Papazian and Pavithran RavindranW.T. Clarke High School, Vanguard“Mr. Feggeler: Taking the Midwest By Storm”REVIEW/CRITICISM 1. Eleni KothesakisNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt”2. Saumya SharmaNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Gotham Rises…Again”3. Sammi SteinJericho High School, JerEcho“’Orange’ Is Now Back”RELIGION/MULTICULTURAL 1. Isabel DeRanieri and Alishbah SaddiquiNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Rage Over Religion”2. Gianna BarberiaHalf Hollow Hills High School West, The Roundup“Earning Equality: Let America Be America Again3. Steven MolinaBellport High School, The Clipper“Students Can Make A Difference”SCHOOL – FEATURE1. Madison FlotteronBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Last Class To Remember 9/11 Will Graduate This Year”2. Teena ThomasNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“A Feud Worth Fighting For”3. Danielle AjodanGreat Neck North High School, Guide Post“A Taste of Hollywood: The Outskirts Shoot At North High”SCHOOL – NEWS1. Katie KonfinoCommack High School, The Courant“The 21st Century Dilemma”2. Michael BorelliEast Islip High School, The Broadcaster“High School Receives Unexpected Renovation”3. Julia LosnerCalhoun High School, Hoofbeats“New Field Trip Policy In Effect”SCHOOL – FINANCIAL NEWS 1. David MenarchemShoreham-Wading River High School, Wildcat Pause“Passing Bond Will Provide Much-Needed Improvements”2. Nelson GomezMassapequa High School, The Chief“District Debate Shifts From Budget To Declining Enrollment”3. Gabriel AjzenmanLynbrook High School, Horizon“BOE Discusses LHS Expansion”SCHOOL SPIRIT1. Katie KonfinoCommack High School, The Courant“Brotherhood Triumphs: CBVS Wins It All”2. Kalleigh ReganMassapequa High School, The Chief“Spirit Week”3. Emma CaseyBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Peer Support’s Awareness Weekend Celebrates 25 Years”SCHOOL CULTURE REPORTING 1. Nelson GomezMassapequa High School, The Chief“Questions On Diversity”2. Max SalitSyosset High School, The Pulse“Bathematics: Improving SHS Bathrooms”3. Krupa PatelNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Merry Hanakwanza”SCIENCE/HEALTH 1. Amber FarooqBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Genetically Modified Organisms Creeping Way Into School Menu”2. Christine CollinsCalhoun High School, Hoofbeats“Dispelling The Myth Of Ebola”3. Emily Budhram and Sara SalomonNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Concussions Cause Career-Ending Injuries”SOCIAL COMMENTARY – SCHOOL1. Alexandra EichensteinHalf Hollow Hills High School West, The Roundup“The Cheating Epidemic and What We’re (Not) Doing To Stop It”2. Kaitlyn LuceyMassapequa High School, The Chief“Redressing The Massapequa High School Dress Code”3. Sephora FerjusteHalf Hollow Hills High School West, The Roundup“Is Hills West A Safe Place To Come Out?”SOCIAL COMMENTARY – GENERAL 1. Nelson GomezMassapequa High School, The ChiefGarner, Brown Cases Raise Questions On Diversity At MHS”2. Christopher SumanoEast Islip High School, The Broadcaster“True Colors Of Racism In America”3. Kevin McCannNorth Shore High School, Viking View“The Origins Of Post-Modern Life”SERIOUS FEATURE1. Gianna BarberiaHalf Hollow Hills High School West, The Roundup“Earning Equality: Let America Be America Again”2. Carolyn RogersShoreham-Wading River High School, Wildcat Pause“The Truth Behind Sexual Harassment”3. Jake BlandiShoreham-Wading River High School, Wildcat Pause“Don’t Turn Your Head To Teen Violence”SOCIAL MEDIA ANALYSIS 1. Sarah ScanlonHalf Hollow Hills High School East, Thunderbird“Positives Of Social Media”2. Cassidy LathamShoreham-Wading River High School, Wildcat Pause“Meninism: Just A Joke Or A Serious Movement?”3. Nicholas PetrilloMassapequa High School, The Chief“Yak-Attack: Yik Yak App Stampedes Campuses Nationwide”SPORTS FEATURE1. Lizzy VolavkaBay Shoe High School, Maroon Echo“High School Athletes Suffer From Burnout, Too”2. James ColganNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“From Highlight Reel To Movie Reel”3. Vishruth GirishNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“All-Scrub To All-County”SPORTS – SCHOOL1. James ColganNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Spiking The Competition”2. Lizzy VolavkaBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“After 23 Years, Girls Lacrosse Coach Retires”3. Lindsay DieumgardBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Teams Rebuild After Seniors Graduate”SPORTS NATIONAL1. James ColganNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Picking Up The Pace”2. James ColganNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Pitchers Hooked On Tommy John”3. Matt SchwartzHalf Hollow Hills High School East, Thunderbird“Baltimore: Home Of America’s Comeback Team”STORYTELLING 1. Katie KonfinoCommack High School, The Courant“Brotherhood Triumphs: CBVS Wins It All”2. Jake NeedlemanSyosset High School, The Pulse“North Carolina To Sign Syosset Head Coach, John Calabria”3. Ben SenzerSyosset High School, The Pulse“Commotion In Student Government”STUDENT ISSUES 1. Danielle SchwartzNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Sweethearts Share Secrets To Success”2. Emily FlyerLynbrook High School, Horizon“What’s The Science Behind This One?”3. Amber BarneyBellport High School, The Clipper“Sadness Isn’t Pretty”STUDENT PROFILE 1. Vishruth GirishNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“All-Scrub To All-County”2. Christina PanouisNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Thumbs Up For YasTube”3. Kordell HammondBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“From Bay Shore To Broadway”TECHNOLOGY1. Sara Salomon and Emily BudhramNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Groundbreaking Lander Reaches New Heights”2. Marchella VerdiShoreham-Wading River High School“Technology Affects Teenage Brains”3. Alec Rich and Josh NouriyelianGreat Neck North High School, Guide Post“North High Implements Freshmen Year Curriculum And Technology Changes”TRAVEL1. Tyler Baron and Jaclyn WilliamsNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Gladiators Go Global”2. Michelle Furman and Aliyha GillEast Meadow High School, Jet Gazette“Amsterdam/London, Baby!”3. Steven MolinaBellport High School, The Clipper“Students Can Make A Difference”Honorable Mention. Antonia BentelPortledge School, Portledge Press“La Belle Vie En France” HERE’S THE COMPLETE LIST OF 2015 LONG ISLAND PRESS HIGH SCHOOL JOURNALISM AWARDS WINNERS:STORY OF THE YEARFIRST PLACE. Alexandra Eichenstein – Half Hollow Hills High School West, The Roundup“The Cheating Epidemic And What We’re (Not) Doing To Stop It”SECOND PLACE. Alejandro Serrano – Bay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Non-Native Students Make Journey For Better Education, Life”THIRD PLACE. Amber Merlini – Massapequa High School, The Chief“Right Gender, Wrong Body: Transgender Students In MHS”HONORABLE MENTION. Amber Farooq – Bay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Genetically Modified Organisms Creeping Way Into School Menu”STUDENT JOURNALIST OF THE YEARFIRST PLACE. Alejandro Serrano – Bay Shore High School, Maroon EchoSECOND PLACE. Nelson Gomez – Massapequa High School, The ChiefTHIRD PLACE. James Colgan – New Hyde Park Memorial High School, The ChariotHONORABLE MENTION. Katie Konfino – Commack High School, The CourantADVISOR OF THE YEARFIRST PLACE. Walt Fishon – Bay Shore High School, Maroon Echo (FOURTH YEAR IN A ROW)SECOND PLACE. Elyn Coyle – Massapequa High School, The ChiefTHIRD PLACE. Christina Semple – Commack High School, The CourantHONORABLE MENTION. Mike Stencel – New Hyde Park Memorial High School, The ChariotNEWSPAPER OF THE YEARFIRST PLACE. Bay Shore High School, Maroon EchoSECOND PLACE. Massapequa High School, The ChiefTHIRD PLACE. New Hyde Park Memorial High School, The ChariotHONORABLE MENTION. Commack High School, The Courant VIDEO AWARDSNEWS STORY1. Nick Albicocco, Ryan Kamber and Eric BrettJericho High School, JerEcho“Jericho Residents Blast New Speed Camera”2. David Schaeffler and Billy FrielingsdorfHauppauge High School, Eagle Watch“Forest Brook Elementary ALS Ice Bucket Challenge”3. Derek SemonHauppauge High School, Eagle Watch“Immigration Day”FEATURE STORY 1. Giulia MilanaJericho High School, JerEcho“Nicolas Vigliotti: One Year Later”2. Rachel HirschheimerJericho High School, JerEcho“Sweet Treats At Jericho’s Homecoming 2014”3. Dylan Rice and Dan NastaHauppauge High School, Eagle Watch“9/11 Memorial”SPORTS1. Nicolas Cecchini andJennifer HugHauppauge High School, Eagle Watch“Kicks For Cancer”ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT1. Katie Prudente 
Hauppauge High School, Eagle Watch“Inherit The Wind”2. Gianna BarberiaHalf Hollow Hills High School West, The Roundup“MoMA”3. Emma Casey and Chloe GuldeBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Page To Screen”SCHOOL SPIRIT1. Giulia Milana, Mikaela Adwar, Carly Lapidus, Sam Newman and Evan SilveraJericho High School, JerEcho“Lip Dub 2015”2. Gianna BarberiaHalf Hollow Hills High School West, The Roundup“End Of The Year Montage”3. Gianna BarberiaHalf Hollow Hills High School West, The Roundup“Homecoming 2014 Recap” ONLINE AWARDSONLINE – NEWS SITE1. JerEchoJericho High School2. The Chief OnlineMassapequa High School3. Guide Post OnlineGreat Neck North High SchoolONLINE – FEATURE1. Nelson GomezMassapequa High School, The Chief“New York Testing Procedures Face Increased Public Scrutiny”2. Alanna Levine andRachel HoffmanJericho High School, JerEcho“Minutes Away, Worlds Apart”3. Jenna BarboneSmithtown East High School, Smithtown Today News Online“‘The Dress’ Used To Address An Important Issue”ONLINE – PHOTO SERIES1. Amanda Damon, Carly Lapidus and Rebecca SimonJericho High School, JerEcho“Humans Of Jericho: Success Edition”2. Kalleigh ReganMassapequa High School, The Chief“Catch A Wave Shines Bright For A Cause”ONLINE – ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT1. Sam NewmanJericho High School, JerEcho“Newman’s Oscars”2. Tim KeuchlerMassapequa High School, The Chief“Taylor Swift’s Album ‘1989’ Arrives In Style”3. Kerry YoungMassapequa High School, The Chief“MHS Students Shine At The School’s Annual Express Night”ONLINE- EDITORIAL1. Rebecca SimonJericho High School, JerEcho“JPOV: Feminism Yesterday And Tomorrow” READ DAVID NORTH’S “LETTERS TO A YOUNG JOURNALIST” HEREInspiring words were delivered by Press/Morey Publishing Managing Editor Timothy Bolger, Press Senior Editor Spencer Rumsey, Press Staff/Education Reporter Jaime Franchi, Morey Publishing Sales Director John Meyers, New Media Director Michael Conforti and Graphic Designer Jon Chim, whose short but powerful remarks were sure to invoke at least a few starry eyes from those in attendance, as they did at last year’s gala.“Art and design are critical components of a truly great story,” declared Chim while introducing the “Newspaper Design/Illustration & Headline” category and several winners. “Photographs and masterful illustrations can elevate any article and make them works of art in themselves. Exceptional design work can streamline a story, directing the readers’ eyes and hearts to its most impactful and emotional elements.”“A great news story is not merely an account of how, what, where, when and why,” explained [#Tomothy] Bolger as he introduced the winners for “Best News Story.” “Yes, it contains all of those elements, but a great news story is truly so much more. A great news story captivates the reader from the first syllable. A great news story shows both sides of the issue. A great news story leaves no stone unturned, serves to inform and incite, and is a catalyst of meaningful reflection and action.“A great news story affects people,” he continued. “It is a public service.”Special awards were dedicated to Aura Diaz, the 16-year-old mother from Brentwood who was murdered in 2005 and Andrea Rebello, the 21-year-old Hofstra junior who tragically lost her life in a shooting two years ago.Twarowski presented the contest’s Robert W. Greene Investigative / Enterprise Journalism Award—named in honor of two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative journalist Robert “Bob” Greene, who besides being a force of nature in the field, was also a powerhouse for good in the classroom and a longtime teacher at the university. The legendary Newsday editor was also instrumental in founding Hofstra University’s journalism and communication programs.“One of the things I love most about journalism is its power to illuminate,” he proclaimed. “To give voice to the voiceless. To shine a light on all the dark places. That’s what investigative journalism does, and here at Hofstra once taught one of the very best of the craft.”“These writers and stories embody Bob Greene’s spirit, his passion, his quest for the truth,” he added. NEWSPAPER DESIGN/ILLUSTRATION & HEADLINECARTOON1. Priyanka AlguNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“To Opt Out Or Not To Opt Out”2. Priyanka AlguNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Who’s The Boss”3. Priyanka AlguNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“NHP Celebrates Local Heroes”CARTOON – ENTERTAINMENT 1. Fabio RiveraW.T. Clarke High School, Vanguard“Fabio’s Corner”2. Michael DonderoEast Islip High School, The Broadcaster“Why Must We Always Wait?”3. Michael DonderoEast Islip High School, The Broadcaster“Growing Up In The Spotlight”CARTOON – POLITICAL 1. Priyanka AlguNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“To Opt Out Or Not To Opt Out”2. Priyanka AlguNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Who’s The Boss?”3. Michael DonderoEast Islip High School, The Broadcaster“Running On Dunkin’”CARTOON/SCHOOL ILLUSTRATION 1. Priyanka AlguNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“To Opt Out Or Not To Opt Out”2. Nicole NunezBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“DC Vs. Marvel”3. Arianna ScavoneJericho High School, JerEcho“Wonderful World”FEATURE DESIGN 1. Kalleigh Regan, Brandan Lawrence and Nelson GomezMassapequa High School, The Chief“My Fair Lady”2. Amber FarooqBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Food Fight”3. Julia SaccamanoSouthold High School, The Sentinel“Teachers’ Extracurricular Activities”FEATURE HEADLINE 1. Sarah QadirCommack High School, The Courant“I’m Geeking Out”2. Andrea ParedesBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“You Better Bee-lieve it: Bee Population Is Declining”3. Clare WalterEast Islip High School, The Broadcaster“Seniors: The Most ‘Common’ Way To APPly”LAYOUT/SECTION 1. Kalleigh Regan, Brandan Lawrence and Nelson GomezMassapequa High School, The Chief“My Fair Lady”2. Nelson GomezMassapequa High School, The Chief“Spirit Week”3. Nicole Nunez and Lindsey DieumegardBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Maroon Echo Sports”LAYOUT/FRONT COVER1. Julia SaccamanoSouthold High School, The Sentinel“Shaving Cream Contest”2. Editorial Board – Katie KonfinoCommack High School, The Courant“November 2014 – Special Issue”3. Amber FarooqBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Maroon Echo Front Page”LAYOUT/OVERALL1. Guide Post StaffGreat Neck North High School, Guide Post“March 2015”2. Hoofbeats StaffCalhoun High School, Hoofbeats“April 2015 Issue”3. Kevin WangW.T. Clarke High School, Vanguard“February 2015: Issue II”NEWS DESIGN1. Graelin MandelGreat Neck North High School, Guide Post“News Section March 2015”2. Editorial Board – Katie KontinoCommack High School, The Courant“November 2014 Cover – Special Issue”3. Editorial Board – Anna TobinCommack High School, The Courant“News, Page 3”NEWS HEADLINE1. Brandan LawrenceMassapequa High School, The Chief“Are the Students Livin’ It Up In The Hotel Massapequa?”2. Amber FarooqBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“How Do You Like Them Apples?”3. Megan KontinoCommack High School, The Courant“Double The Trouble”NEWS ILLUSTRATION1. Solomon AguirreBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Teen Sleep Deprivation Rates Increasing”2. Alejandro SerranoBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Suicide”3. Yolanda HernandezBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“The Death Of The Teen Flick”ORIGINAL ILLUSTRATION1. Emily RosenbergHalf Hollow Hills High School East, Thunderbird“2014 High School East Student Film Festival”2. Juliane Van GordenSouthold High School, The Sentinel“Winter Fashion”3. Melita HowellShoreham-Wading River High School, Wildcat Pause“From Student To Jail Bird: My Trip To The County Jail”PHOTO ESSAY1. Kalleigh Regan and Nelson GomezMassapequa High School, The Chief“Spirit Week”2. Alexandra Nolan and Gabby GartenJericho High School, JerEcho“Park At Your Own Risk”3. Amber Farooq and Tommy LinaresBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“A Spirited Bunch”PHOTOGRAPHY/SERIES1. Karen Papazian and Pavithran RavindranW.T. Clarke High School, Vanguard“Mr. Feggeler: Taking The Midwest By Storm!”2. Kalleigh ReganMassapequa High School, The Chief“Roving Reporter: MHS Weighs In On New Lanyard Policy”3. Lily SaeliSouthold High School, The Sentinel“Spirit Day”LAYOUT/SINGLE PAGE – SCHOOL1. Avani SinghW.T. Clarke High School, Vanguard“Humans Of Clarke”2. Karen Papazian and Pavithran RavindranW.T. Clarke High School, Vanguard“Mr. Feggeler: Taking The Midwest By Storm!”3. Nicole NunezBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Injuries On The Field”LAYOUT/SINGLE PAGE – GENERAL1. Julia Kaluta and Julia MargalitGreat Neck North High School, Guide Post“Tips And Tricks To An Organized Day”2. Sam Berger and Brandon DiazEast Meadow High School, Jet Gazette“Sports”3. Kevin RosandEast Islip High School, The Broadcaster“February Issue, Page 5”SINGLE PHOTO1. Joseph WoryszSouthold High School, The Sentinel“Southold’s Spirit Day Shaving Cream War”2. Kalleigh ReganMassapequa High School, The Chief“A New Epidemic?”3. Tommy LinaresBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“To Stand Or Not To Stand…”GRAPHIC ART1. Nicole NunezBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“AP/IB Lack Diversity”2. Carolyn RogersShoreham-Wading River High School, Wildcat Pause“The Truth Behind Sexual Harassment”3. Nelson Gomez, Kalleigh Regan and Brandan LawrenceMassapequa High School, The Chief“My Fair Lady”SPORTS PHOTO1. Alicia RendaDivision Avenue High School, Dragon Tales“Swim Team Goes Undefeated”2. Skyler KesslerLynbrook High School, Horizon“Raymond Farrell High Jump”3. Nicole NunezBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Softball Pitcher”NEWSPAPER SPECIAL SECTIONS AWARDSSPORTS 1. Katie KonfinoCommack High School, The Courant“November 2014 Special Issue Wrap Around”2. Danielle Ajodan and Won JungGreat Neck North High School, Guide Post“Sports November 2014”3. Lindsay DieumgardBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Maroon Echo Sports”OPEN CATEGORY1. Katie KontinoCommack High School, The Courant“Freshman Survival Guide”2. Amber Merlini, Jacqueline Rapisardi, Danielle Anzelone, Jillian Hand and Kaitlyn LuceyMassapequa High School, The Chief“Gender Issues”SPECIAL ISSUE – MAGAZINE1. Great Neck North High School, Guide Post“200th Anniversary Guide Post Special Edition: Great Neck North High School – Throughout The Years – 1929 And Beyond”last_img read more