EVERTON VS TOTTENHAM HOTSPUR

first_imgEVERTON (4-1-3-2)HOWARD,COLEMAN, STONES, MORI, BAINES,BARRY,DEULOFEU, CLEVERLEY, BARKLEY,KONE, LUKAKUTOTTENHAM (4-2-3-1)KANE,ERIKSEN, DEMBELE, LAMELA,DIER, ALLI,ROSE, VERTONGHEN, ALDERWEIRELD, WALKER,LLORISTottenham Hotspur arrive at Goodison Park in fourth place, just one point behind third-placed Manchester City. They have lost only two games this season, equal lowest in the Barclays Premier League with Leicester. They have also conceded only 15 goals, the fewest in the division.Everton, meanwhile, have dropped to 11th following two defeats in their last three games, including Monday’s dramatic 4-3 reverse against Stoke City. At Goodison Park, Everton have won just three, yet they have also scored 22 home goals, the most in the division.Spurs will hope that Erik Lamela maintains his good record; the Argentine has scored four goals in his past five games in all competitions for Tottenham. And team-mate Harry Kane scored 29 goals in 2015.Everton’s Romelu Lukaku is enjoying an equally rich vein of form; he has 18 goals in all competitions so far and has 11 in his last 10 games, scoring in nine.And while there are proven goalscorers involved, a draw is the favoured result given the history of this fixture. In 23 previous Goodison Park clashes, no fewer than 10 have been drawn (including five at 0-0).Tottenham have won on eight occasions including last season – when Kane got the winner.But when they met at White Hart Lane in August it finished 0-0, with Spurs extended their unbeaten run against Everton home and away to six games.Everton give tests to Tom Cleverley, James McCarthy and Phil Jagielka while Tottenham have a doubt over Moussa Dembele.last_img read more

Pitches not conducive to big scores – Holder

first_imgPORT-OF-SPAIN, Trinidad (CMC):Test captain Jason Holder says the standard of regional pitches needs to be improved if teams are to produce more attractive cricket.The 24-year-old, also the Barbados Pride skipper, said that scores in the ongoing Regional Super50 had been low because pitches were slow and turning and not conducive to good strokeplay.”It’s been tough. Obviously, the scores are not what we’ve been accustomed to in one-day cricket, and I think that’s been due to the slow pitches,” Holder said.”I’ve found it very difficult so far batting in this tournament, in the middle overs especially, and trying to get the ball off the square. I think spinners are dominating it, and that’s because the ball has spun quite early and quite sharply.”I just think we need to work a little bit more on improving our pitches and … strokeplay, and the viewing of the cricket would be a lot better.”The highest total of the tournament has been Jamaica Scorpions’ 260 against minnows ICC Americas at the Sir Frank Worrell ground at St Augustine here in the second-round Group ‘A’ contest.In Group ‘B’ played in St Kitts, the highest total there was 255 by Guyana Jaguars in the final round when they chased down a competitive total set by Combined Campuses and Colleges Marooners.Between both groups, there have been 14 totals under 200 runs, with four of these coming at Queen’s Park Oval, and Holder said that the par score at the tournament’s premier venue would be quite small.”It’s been a tough pitch. The games I’ve seen here and have played here have been tough going in terms of batting, so you have to be very sharp in the field in terms of restricting opposition under 200 runs. I think 200, 210 is probably a par score on this track.”The tournament is in its final stages. Barbados Pride clash with Windward Islands Volcanoes in the second semi-final today.last_img read more

GC Foster principal takes a dive at swimming pool project

first_imgThe state of the swimming pool at the G.C. Foster College of Physical Education and Sport has been a sore point for decades. Current principal of the institution, Dr Joyce Graham-Royal, said it will cost $91 million to repair the facility, which has never been used since it was built in 1980. In late 2014, Minister of Sport Natalie Neita-Headley had announced that Government would be donating the funds to repair the pool via the Sports Development Foundation. However, Graham-Royal told The Gleaner yesterday that she had since learned that the funds, which had been earmarked for the pool work, had been spent on refurbishing the synthetic track at the institution, which was reopened last October. The track cost $171 million to repair. Graham-Royal said because of the clay soil at the Spanish Town-based sporting college, repairing the track had cost much more than the projected figure. Successive principals over the last few years have threshed around with the idea and as recently as 2008, the estimate to repair the Olympic-sized swimming and diving pools was at $50 million. GETTING THE MONEY Graham-Royal, who became principal of the institution in 2014, said fixing the pool will be her next ‘big’ project and said she does not intend to begin the project until she is sure she has all the money to complete it as she does not want to start and not be able to finish. “(I need) at least three quarters of it because it wouldn’t make sense; it means work would have stopped,” she told The Gleaner. Students of the school, who train to be teachers of physical education, must now use a tiny pool in Old Harbour for swimming lessons. “So I have to pay more than $10,000 monthly for them to learn to swim. You’re not a complete PE teacher until you’re able to swim,” Graham-Royal, herself a graduate of the G.C. Foster College, who later studied abroad, said. “When I went to the University of Mainz in Germany to study, I could not graduate until I learned to swim,” she added. Meanwhile, Graham-Royal also noted that the institution as also losing money as there were some interested parties who would have used the facility had it been operational. “Just this morning some students from a university in Canada called. They had a contingent of 50 and wanted to come for the summer,” she said. “So we are missing all of that. We really do need some private sector injection. We can’t do it otherwise,” she concluded.last_img read more

UN: Zika virus will be ‘way down’ before Olympics

first_imgGENEVA (AP):The head of the World Health Organization’s Zika response team is predicting that Brazil will host a “fantastic Olympics”, and that the mosquito-borne virus will be “way down” by the time the Summer Games begin in Rio de Janeiro on August 5.Dr Bruce Aylward, WHO’s executive director for outbreaks and health emergencies, said yesterday at a news conference that the mosquito population is expected to drop off around when Rio hosts the games, since it will be winter in the southern hemisphere.Rio’s Olympic venues are also in a relatively confined area, he noted, making it easier for authorities to control the local mosquito population.”Brazil is going to have a fantastic Olympics and it’s going to be a successful Olympics and the world is going to go there,” Aylward said. “I just wish I was going there, but there’s not going to be a lot of problems there by then, so I’ll be somewhere else.”Aylward also pointed to the “probability” that the Zika virus will have “gone through” a large slice of the country’s population by then, so many Brazilians might have developed an immunity to the disease by the time of the August 5-21 games.Zika, however, is just the latest cloud hanging over Brazil ahead of South America’s first Olympics. The country is coping with its worst recession in 100 years, impeachment proceedings against President Dilma Rousseff and a wide-ranging corruption scandal centred on the state-controlled oil-and-gas giant Petrobras.Brazil has recorded more than one million suspected Zika infections in recent months amid strong concerns that the virus could be linked to a spike in the number of babies born with abnormally small heads microcephaly and to a rare neurological syndrome that can cause temporary paralysis in people of all ages.In Brazil yesterday, ministers, state governors, health authorities and members of the armed forces visited schools throughout the country to involve students in the nationwide campaign to eradicate the Aedes aegypti mosquito that spreads the Zika virus.WHO has declared a global health emergency due to the virus, saying it could produce as many as 4 million cases in the next year. The mosquitoes that spread Zika which also spread dengue and yellow fever are entrenched across the region and in a wide belt around the globe, mostly in tropical areas.last_img read more