China reports H5N1 outbreak in Guangdong

first_imgJun 17, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – China’s agriculture ministry today announced an H5N1 avian influenza outbreak at a village in Guangdong province, not far from Hong Kong, where officials recently found the virus in live-bird markets.The ministry said the outbreak in Guangdong struck 3,873 ducks in Yashan Village, where 17,127 ducks were culled to prevent the spread of the virus, Xinhua, China’s state news agency, reported today. The ministry did not say when the outbreak began.Mainland China’s last reported outbreak occurred in early April at a poultry farm in Tibet, according to a report from the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE). A few weeks before that outbreak, officials reported an outbreak in Guangdong province that hit chickens at a market in the city of Guangzhou.On Jun 7, animal health officials in Hong Kong, located on Guangdong’s south-central border on the Pearl River delta, announced they had found the H5N1 virus in chicken droppings gathered at poultry markets. A few days later they found the virus in droppings at additional markets, which led to the culling of all market poultry.Authorities suspended all shipments of birds from the mainland and local farms for 3 weeks. Officials haven’t yet found the source of the virus.Elsewhere, the news media in Vietnam are reporting an H5N1 outbreak at a household in the central province of Quang Ngai, according to a report from Xinhua today. The virus has struck 690 chickens since Jun 12 and was also responsible for outbreak in Tra Vinh province, in southern Vietnam, the newspaper The People, Vietnam’s Communist Party publication, reported.Bui Ba Bong, an agriculture minister, told the Vietnam Economic Times that though the number of new outbreaks has declined, the country should maintain its prevention efforts and spur more research on the disease, Xinhua reported. He said the country is exploring more than 30 variants of the avian flu virus that have been isolated from poultry and wild birds.In other developments, the United Kingdom today published an epidemiology report on a highly pathogenic H7N7 outbreak that was confirmed at a farm in Oxfordshire on Jun 4. The report from the Department of Environment, Food, and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) said that as of Jun 11 the outbreak was confined to a single farm, but an investigation into the source of the virus would continue, according to a DEFRA press release.The report said the highly pathogenic H7N7 strain found at the farm could have evolved from a low-pathogenic strain that was already present there, though authorities are investigating a number of other possibilities, the press release said.Nigel Gibbens, DEFRA’s chief veterinary officer, said in the press release that the United Kingdom has a steady but low risk for avian influenza outbreaks. “The report highlights the need for flock owners and poultry vets to remain vigilant for signs of the disease, including the possibility of low pathogenic avian influenza,” he said.Meanwhile, the agriculture ministry in Haiti on Jun 12 reported three outbreaks of low-pathogenic H5N2 avian flu in birds at three locations in the central, northern, and southern parts of the country, according to a report from the OIE. The outbreaks began on May 20 and appeared to be ongoing.Among the three sites, 87 birds were exposed to the virus and 11 were sickened. No deaths were reported, according to the report. Birds at the locations included chickens, a turkey, and fighting cocks. Some did not show clinical signs of disease.The report listed illegal animal movements and the introduction of new live animals as sources of the infection. Some officials in Haiti have suspected the H5N2 virus could have come from the Dominican Republic, which reported H5N2 outbreaks in late 2007, according to a Jun 15 report from Prensa Latina, a news agency based in Cuba. However, Haitian ambassador Jose Serulle said the virus could have come from anywhere.See also:OIE reports on 2008 Chinese H5N1 outbreaksJun 11 CIDRAP News story “Hong Kong finds more H5N1, culls all market poultry”Jun 17 DEFRA press releaselast_img read more

Ronaldinho set for August 24 release: Judicial sources

first_imgJudge Gustavo Amarilla has set a date of August 24 to hear the case against the brothers.Prosecutors have submitted a proposal to the judge that would see Ronaldinho, 40, pay a $90,000 fine “to repair social damage” but be allowed to return home to Brazil where he would have to appear before a judge every three months for a year.Ronaldinho denies having any knowledge the passports were fake.His brother — who allegedly knew about the false passports — would have to pay a $110,000 fine and appear before a judge every three months for two years. Brazil great Ronaldinho could be freed on August 24 following five months detention in Paraguay over a forged passport, judicial sources told AFP on Monday.The former Barcelona, AC Milan and Paris Saint-Germain star was detained alongside his brother Roberto de Assis Moreira on March 6, accused of entering Paraguay in possession of false passports.They spent a month behind bars before paying a $1.6 million bail and being released to house arrest at the plush Palmaroga Hotel in the historic center of the Paraguayan capital Asuncion. Prosecutors also asked for a two-year suspended prison sentence for Roberto de Assis Moreira, who is also Ronaldinho’s business manager.The brothers arrived in Paraguay on March 4 without any issues, with Ronaldinho, 2005 Ballon d’Or winner, due to take part in event in support of disadvantaged children.However, shortly after their arrival, the pair were taken into police custody when investigators raided their hotel following the discovery they had fake documents.The investigation has since expanded into a case of possible money laundering.Ronaldinho, considered one of the greatest footballers of all time, was crucial in Brazil’s 2002 World Cup win.center_img Topics :last_img read more

Governor Wolf Signs Legislation to Protect Workers, Motorists in Work Zones

first_img October 19, 2018 Press Release,  Public Safety,  Transportation Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today signed Senate Bill 172, the Automated Speed Enforcement in Work Zones legislation, which aims to deter speeding in work zones and ultimately improve motorist and roadway worker safety.“Crashes, injuries, and deaths that occur because of speeding are completely preventable, and this law is a major step in enhancing safety in Pennsylvania’s work zones,” Governor Wolf said. “We always urge people to drive safely, and this is especially critical for those working within and driving through work zones.”This new law has three key provisions, one of which allows the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) and Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission (PTC) to perform a five-year pilot program in which some construction and maintenance work zones will have cameras equipped with LIDAR or radar to take photos of license plates of any vehicle exceeding the work zone speed limit by 11 mph or more when workers are present.If a violation is committed, a Pennsylvania State Police representative will review it and then a notice of violation will be issued to the registered vehicle owner. The first violation is a warning, the second violation results in a $75 fine and the third and subsequent violation means a $150 fine. Violations will not be subject to driving points or merit rating for insurance purposes. The law allows PennDOT and the PTC to choose which contractor or department-force work zones on the federal aid highway system to use in the pilot. Special advanced signage advising motorists of the camera enforcement have to be erected at the affected work zones.In anticipation of the bill’s signing, officials from PennDOT, the PTC, the City of Philadelphia, the American Council of Engineering Companies, the Associated Pennsylvania Constructors, the Associated Pennsylvania Constructors and American Automobile Association held an event in Philadelphia this morning to mark its importance.“I am thrilled that the Legislature and Governor have taken this step that aims to save the lives of our employees, motorists, and our partners in the contracting community,” PennDOT Secretary Leslie S. Richards said. “We have seen some speeds in work zones that are simply unacceptable, and we are confident that this tool will drive down speeding violations.”PennDOT, the PA Turnpike, and the Pennsylvania State Police (PSP) are working to develop a Request for Proposals for a vendor to administer the system and provide the hardware. The selected vendor will be compensated per a flat fee and not per violation.“We have advocated for this safety measure for a long time and I am confident that it will be a game-changer for worker safety in Pennsylvania,” PTC CEO Mark Compton said. “While this law is not a cure-all, it echoes our continued efforts to improve safety on our roadways.”Fines paid for these violations, minus the costs to operate and maintain the program will be deposited into the Motor License Fund. Of those fines, in the first three years 45 percent of the fines will be transferred to the PSP for recruiting, training, and equipping cadets as well as increased state trooper presence in work zones. Fifteen percent will be invested in work zone safety, traffic safety, and educating the public on work zone safety. After the third year, PennDOT or the PTC will use fine revenues to develop a Work Zone and Highway Safety Program for improvements and countermeasures to improve work zone safety.The law aims to address ongoing safety concerns in work zones. Forty percent of all work zone crashes involve speeding. Crashes in work zones on Interstates and the Turnpike increased from 618 in 2012 to 1,008 in 2016. There has been a 5 percent increase in the average annual rate of work zone crashes statewide from 2012-2016, increasing from 1,661 in 2012 to 2,075 in 2016.As an additional provision, the legislation establishes a five-year pilot program within the City of Philadelphia for speeding enforcement cameras. Automated speed enforcement zones will be permitted along the entire length of U.S. 1 (Roosevelt Boulevard) between Ninth Street and the Bucks County line. As with the work zone pilot, special signage advising motorists of the camera enforcement have to be erected denoting the automated speed enforcement zone.“Our city and our families deserve safer streets,” said Mayor Jim Kenney. “Managing speeds to save lives is a cornerstone of Vision Zero. With around 100 people being killed in traffic crashes on Philadelphia streets every year, we are committed to continuing to bring to together street design, education, enforcement, and policy changes that will manage speeds and, thus, save lives making Philadelphia streets safe for everyone.”City Council must adopt an ordinance to begin a pilot program. The Philadelphia Parking Authority is designated as the system operator and cameras will be equipped with LIDAR or radar.The third provision in the law allows the use of LIDAR speed-measuring devices for the automated speed enforcement programs and PSP.The law establishing the PennDOT and PTC pilot program takes effect in 120 days and violations can be issued 60 days after publication in the PA Bulletin. The law provisions for the City of Philadelphia pilot program take effect in 60 days. PennDOT must establish a temporary regulation for the calibration and testing of LIDAR speed-measuring devices before it can be used for automated enforcement or by PSP.Information on work-zone laws and safety in Pennsylvania is available at www.penndot.gov/safety in the “Work Zone” traffic safety and driver topic page. Governor Wolf Signs Legislation to Protect Workers, Motorists in Work Zonescenter_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more