Heat wave in San Diego County to last throughout the weekend

first_img KUSI Newsroom KUSI Newsroom, July 12, 2019 Heat wave in San Diego County to last throughout the weekend SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – A heat wave is expected to send temperatures soaring well into the triple digits today in the San Diego County deserts. The National Weather Service issued an excessive heat warning for the San Diego County deserts that will be in effect from 10 a.m. today through 8p.m. Monday.High temperatures near the coast will be in the high 70s to low 80s today, while temperatures are expected to reach the high 80s today in the western valleys, forecasters said.A high of around 113 degrees is expected today in Borrego Springs.The scorching temperatures could cool a degree or two over the weekend, but high temperatures were expected to remain around the same before cooler weather arrives Tuesday, according to the NWS.The weather service advised that those who work outdoors should avoid the midday sun, wear light, loose-fitting clothing and drink plenty of water.Nighttime lows will be in the mid to high 80s today in the county deserts, meaning the minimal cooling at night could pose a health risk to those who don’t have access to air conditioning because the body needs time to cool down from the day’s heat, according to the NWS.Avoid leaving senior citizens and kids at home without air conditioning, if possible. And never leave a child, senior or pet in a parked vehicle, even with windows cracked open, because interior temperatures can quickly turn lethal. Posted: July 12, 2019 Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

NOW HIRING 10 New Job Openings In Wilmington

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below are some of the newest job openings in Wilmington:Full-Time Purchasing Analyst III at OSRAM SYLVANIAFull-Time Maintenance Worker at CareOne at WilmingtonFull-Time Store Manager at Cumberland FarmsFull-Time Fence Installer at Pro FenceFull-Time Buyer / Planner at KochFull-Time Assembly Operator at KochFull-Time Cell Leader – Production at KochFull-Time Heating Technician at Parts 4 HeatingFull-Time Molecular Biologist at ChemGenes Corp.Full-Time Buyer at Locus Robotics(NOTE: Wilmington businesses — Feel free to send me your job postings at wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedNOW HIRING: 10 New Job Openings In WilmingtonIn “Business”NOW HIRING: 10 New Job Openings In WilmingtonIn “Business”NOW HIRING: 10 Job Openings In WilmingtonIn “Business”last_img read more

Verdict against 6 Gaibandha war crimes accused Wednesday

first_imgThe International Crimes Tribunal (ICT)-1 on Tuesday set Wednesday to pronounce judgment in crimes against humanity case against six alleged war criminals from Gaibandha, including Jamaat leader and former lawmaker Abdul Aziz alias Ghoramara Aziz.The other five accused are Md Ruhul Amin alias Monju, 61, Md Abdul Latif, 61, Abu Muslim Mohammad Ali, 59, Md Nazmul Huda, 60, and Md Abdur Rahim Miah, 62. Of these, only Latif is in jail.“Verdict tomorrow,” said justice Md Shahinur Islam, chairman of the three-member panel of the tribunal.The tribunal on 23 October kept the judgment on CAV (curia advisory vult, a Latin legal term meaning the court awaits verdict) after concluding hearing the arguments of the case for second time.The recently reconstituted ICT-1 on 12 October on Tuesday fixed 22 October for rehearing the arguments in the case.Earlier, the tribunal on 9 May had kept the verdict in the case on CAV for the first time.“But due to death of justice Anwarul Haque, former chairman of the tribunal, government had to reconstitute the tribunal and the new tribunal decided to rehear the arguments,” prosecutor Syed Sayedul Haque Suman told BSS.last_img read more

Chicago Awaits 2 Historic Hearings in Fatal Police Shooting

first_imgBy DON BABWIN, Associated PressCHICAGO (AP) — Three Chicago police officers will learn this week whether a judge thinks they lied about the 2014 killing of Laquan McDonald to protect another White officer who shot the Black teenager 16 times. That officer, meanwhile, will learn how long he may spend in prison.Officer Jason Van Dyke was convicted by a jury in October of second-degree murder and 16 counts of aggravated battery — one for each bullet he shot McDonald with. He’s due to be sentenced Friday by Judge Vincent Gaughan.in this Dec. 14, 2018, file photo, former Chicago police Officer Jason Van Dyke, left, appears for a hearing at the Leighton Criminal Court Building, in Chicago. (Antonio Perez/Chicago Tribune via AP, Pool, File)Judge Domenica Stephenson is set to deliver her verdict Thursday to the three officers accused of lying about the shooting, which sparked large protests and accusations of a cover-up after dashcam video of the confrontation emerged 13 months after it happened.The video, which city officials refused to release until ordered by a judge, showed Van Dyke firing round after round into the 17-year-old, and it conflicted with the officers’ accounts, which stated that McDonald aggressively swung a knife at police and kept trying to get up even after he was shot.Van Dyke is believed to be the first Chicago officer convicted in a fatal on-duty shooting of an African-American. The other three — officers Thomas Gaffney and Joseph Walsh and detective David March — are thought to the first to be charged with trying to cover up an on-duty shooting.Although their case has not garnered as much attention as Van Dyke’s, many view it as more significant because it challenges the code of silence that critics have long accused the police department of using to cover up its messes.“This is a criminal prosecution for officers participating in a code of silence, doing what they’ve always done, what’s expected of them,” said Craig Futterman, a University of Chicago law professor who helped secure the release of the video. “But here the message is if you lie, if you cover up, you can go to jail.”Christy Lopez, a former Justice Department attorney who helped lead an investigation of the police department after the McDonald shooting, said it’s noteworthy that the trial was held in Chicago, where Mayor Rahm Emanuel famously acknowledged the department’s code of silence after the release of the video.The prosecution of the three officers “gives me optimism that other cities and police departments will come to the same realization that Chicago has and think of police abuse as a systems issue,” Lopez said.Attorneys for the officers accused of lying about the shooting ridiculed the decision to charge them, telling the court during the trial that the officers merely wrote what they observed or, in March’s case, what the other officers told him they saw. They said there was no evidence that the officers conspired to get their stories straight.“The state wants you to criminalize police reports,” McKay bellowed at one point.Robert Weisskopff, a retired Chicago police officer who once headed the lieutenants’ union, expressed worry that the case will cause other officers to be less forthcoming.“What cops on the street are going to start writing is, ‘We came, we saw, he’s dead,’” he said.“Why would you do any more investigation if you thought you could lose everything if what you believed was true turns out not to be?”Jim Pasco, executive director of the National Fraternal Order of Police, said officers already shaken by the prosecution of six Baltimore police officers in the 2015 arrest and death of Freddie Gray — all were acquitted — echoed that sentiment.“What’s the incentive to disclose everything you know if you fear it will be used against you?” he said.The city isn’t planning the same show of force for Van Dyke’s sentencing that it deployed on the day of the verdict in his trial, when metal barriers lined the street outside the courthouse and dozens of uniformed officers stood every few feet. There are no plans to cancel high school sporting events or nervous parents talking about keeping their kids home from school, like there were on that day.Although police were not expecting a large turnout of protesters for Van Dyke’s hearing, Black community leaders said they would pay close attention to the sentence. The Rev. Marshall Hatch, a prominent Black minister on the city’s West Side, said the hopefulness that the Black community felt after Van Dyke was convicted will evaporate if he receives a light prison sentence or even walks free.“It will be like he got away with murder, absolutely,” he said.Estimates of the sentence Van Dyke might get have varied wildly: The murder charge carries a prison term of four to 20 years, but Gaughan also could just give Van Dyke probation for that count. The aggravated battery charge carries a sentence of six to 30 years behind bars and does not allow for probation alone.Walsh, March and Gaffney, who is the only one of the three still with the police department, each face charges of official misconduct, conspiracy and obstructing justice. The misconduct charge carries a maximum prison terms of five years. The obstruction charge carries a maximum three-year term. The maximum sentence for conspiracy cannot exceed the sentence for the underlying offenses.last_img read more