There Was Another Massive Upset In The Big 10 Tonight

first_imgAn exterior view of Northwestern's football stadium.EVANSTON, IL – SEPTEMBER 07: A general view of Ryan Field before the Northwestern Wildcats take on the Syracuse Orange on September 7, 2013 in Evanston, Illinois. (Photo by Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images)It was a day full of upsets in the Big Ten. So, it’s fitting that a major one would go down at night, too.The league, which has already suffered losses today to Troy, USF, BYU, Kansas and Temple, can add Akron to that list.Northwestern, a 21-point favorite, fell at home to Akron this evening. The Wildcats lost, 39-34. Akron outscored Northwestern 13-6 in the fourth quarter.It’s Akron’s first win over a Big Ten team in more than a century. Seriously.Akron knocks off Northwestern 39-34 for its first win against a Big Ten team since 1894 – yes, 1894— Brett McMurphy (@Brett_McMurphy) September 16, 2018The Big Ten has certainly seen better days.The B1G has losses to:TroyKansasAkronMissouriUSFTempleBYU— Dustin Schutte (@SchutteCFB) September 16, 2018At least Ohio State, Penn State and Michigan looked good today. The Big Ten is going to need to pick things up in a major way moving forward.last_img read more

Education Minister Hails Council of Community Colleges

first_img Education, Youth and Information Minister, Senator the Hon. Ruel Reid, is lauding the Council of Community Colleges of Jamaica (CCCJ) for making quality higher education accessible to all Jamaicans. Community colleges offer University Council of Jamaica (UCJ) accredited programmes in areas such as engineering, technology, business, hospitality and tourism management, agriculture, education (trainers of primary-school teachers), and the humanities – criminal justice, social work, logistics, business process outsourcing and management. Education, Youth and Information Minister, Senator the Hon. Ruel Reid, is lauding the Council of Community Colleges of Jamaica (CCCJ) for making quality higher education accessible to all Jamaicans.He said the entity is making an invaluable contribution to national development by ensuring the integrity of the range of certificate, associate and bachelor degree programmes offered at community colleges across the island.“So relevant are these programmes that three Caribbean islands – Turks and Caicos, Anguilla, and The Bahamas – have begun to offer the CCCJ programmes,” he noted.Minister Reid was delivering the keynote address at the CCCJ’s 15th anniversary banquet at The Jamaica Pegasus hotel in New Kingston on December 14.Noting that community colleges have become a vital part of the post-secondary and higher-education systems, Mr. Reid said the accessibility, flexibility and affordability of these institutions provide options for students who otherwise might not pursue tertiary studies.“As you maintain the high standards expected of local tertiary institutions, you have been developing new programmes, sometimes in collaboration with the HEART Trust/NTA, to respond to the demands of the business sector,” he said.The Education Minister said there is great value in working within the existing capacity of the community colleges, based on the programmes offered and the need to quickly train and certify the country’s workforce.Community colleges offer University Council of Jamaica (UCJ) accredited programmes in areas such as engineering, technology, business, hospitality and tourism management, agriculture, education (trainers of primary-school teachers), and the humanities – criminal justice, social work, logistics, business process outsourcing and management.The CCCJ’s 15th anniversary banquet was the culmination of year-long celebrations showcasing the work of local community and multidisciplinary colleges.The function featured the presentation of awards of excellence to 29 former chairpersons, executive directors and principals/presidents of colleges; and faculty, administrative and support staff who have made significant contributions.Awards for academic excellence were also presented to students as well as the longest serving member of staff.The CCCJ supervises and coordinates the work of community colleges in Jamaica. Through its regulatory function, it seeks to determine and implement common standards in colleges to ensure the integrity of programmes. Noting that community colleges have become a vital part of the post-secondary and higher-education systems, Mr. Reid said the accessibility, flexibility and affordability of these institutions provide options for students who otherwise might not pursue tertiary studies. Story Highlightslast_img read more

Campaign School for Women Begins This Weekend

first_imgMore than 50 Nova Scotia women will learn how to navigate a campaign or run for elected office through a series of hands-on workshops at this weekend’s sixth Campaign School for Women. The school, hosted by the Nova Scotia Advisory Council on the Status of Women and held at Mount Saint Vincent University, will feature female political leaders. Marilyn More, Minister responsible for the Status of Women, MP Megan Leslie, MLA Kelly Regan, Marlene Wells, an organizer, Janet Fryday-Dorey, a member of an executive, and many others will offer advice and counsel based on their own experiences. “More than half of Nova Scotians are women, yet fewer than one quarter of our elected leaders, whether on the municipal, provincial or federal level, are female,” said Ms. More. “If we’re to increase the number of women in leadership, we need to increase the number of women running for elected office.” The idea for the campaign school came from Nova Scotia women who, during a series of Status of Women political skills workshops in 2002, said they wanted more information about the nuts and bolts of running. “The campaign school is about providing women with a realistic picture of what’s involved with running your own campaign,” said Stephanie MacInnis-Langley, executive director, Nova Scotia Advisory Council on the Status of Women. “The school’s speakers and workshop leaders are trailblazers who are well positioned to inspire our future women leaders.” For more details on the school, go to www.women.gov.ns.ca . The Nova Scotia Advisory Council on the Status of Women is committed to increasing the participation of women in decisions that affect their lives, families and communities. One way women can realize equality, inclusion and empowerment is through direct political involvement.last_img read more

RBI increases banks loan exposure limit to single NBFC

first_imgMumbai: The RBI on Thursday increased loan exposure limit of banks to a single NBFC (excluding gold loan companies) from 15 per cent to 20 per cent of its capital base, a move that will help increase credit supply to the crisis-ridden shadow banking sector. According to the extant ‘Large Exposures Framework (LEF)’, banks’ exposure to a single non-banking financial company (NBFC) is restricted to 15 per cent of their available eligible capital base, while general single counter-party exposure limit is 20 per cent, which can be extended to 25 per cent by banks’ boards under exceptional circumstances. Also Read – Thermal coal import may surpass 200 MT this fiscal”It has been decided that a bank’s exposure to a single NBFC (excluding gold loan companies) will be restricted to 20 per cent of that bank’s eligible capital base,” the central bank said in a circular. The government on its part has also been taking steps to increase liquidity in the NBFC sector, which was hit after default by IL&FS Group. The liquidity crunch in the NBFC sector has hit the retail loan segment in the country leading to slowdown in key consumer sector lending.last_img read more

Ministry of Higher Education officially recognizes the UIR

By Asmaa BahadiRabat – It’s official: diplomas from the International University of Rabat (UIR) are now equivalent to national diplomas. This comes following the publication in the official listing No. 6485 of July 25, 2016, Decree No. 2.16.244 which grants the university the recognition of the state.UIR, first university established in partnership with the state, has become the only university recognized by the state as part of the 01.00 law on higher education. A complete file containing all required elements and demonstrating all criteria defined by the tender specification was filed to the Ministry at the beginning of August 2015. The Minister of Higher Education assigned a committee of experts to study the application file.In addition to the file submission, UIR’s president and several employees made an oral presentation in front of the commission at the Ministry, and the commission made a technical visit to the University.The National Commission for Higher Education and Coordination (CNCES) approved the committee’s final report on December 28, 2015, consequently giving recognition to the UIR. The University was notified in writing from the Minister of Higher Education during the month of January 2016.According to a statement on this occasion, the University is stepping up its efforts since its establishment in 2010, “to create an excellent educational framework, develop a high-level research, and the lessons taught by highly qualified teaching staff and to offer a friendly environment for the students.” read more

Amale Elatrassi talks about Muslim Wolf Rape Forced Exil and Imprisonment

By Hajar ElkahlaouiRabat – Moroccan writer Amale El Atrassi, has described herself as a “Muslim Wolf”. This name is also the title of her memoir about her conservative family’s traditions, culture, and lifestyle.The novel, published in 2013, also tells of her painful and the suffering that she lived because of being raped and having an alcoholic, violent father who profoundly hates women. The 40-year-old writer comes from a family of six children, including the humorist Mustapha El Atrassi, who didn’t want the book to be published.In an interview with Morocco World News, El Atrassi shares her life experiences and plans for the future.What is the main target of your book “Muslim Wolf”?Amale Elatrassi: I wrote this book to help women who had similar experiences. Mine remains atypical but every day, I am contacted by hundreds of women from all social backgrounds. I also started writing, after going through hell, to make my peace with the past.How did you feel while writing the book?Amale Elatrassi: I used to be a girl with borderline personality disorder after my return from Morocco. I had no self esteem. I was broken inside because I experienced violence and sexual abuse. I didn’t believe in me nor in anyone else so I became self destructive.Was your father the main cause of your suffering?Amale Elatrassi: I blame my father Choukri for everything I went through in France and in Morocco. He never showed us affection since our birth. He was furious when he knew his first child was a female. He even blamed my mother for being pregnant with a girl like it was her fault. A year after my birth, Farid was born. He was the only kid he took in his arms. He covered him in kisses. He watched TV with him. When we went to Morocco, my father’s family was so proud of his sons while my sisters and I felt useless like Choukri used to tell us all the time. I used to dress up, to fight, and to climb trees as boys just because my dad always thought that girls should cook and stay home.How was your relationship with your mother?Amale Elatrassi: A close relationship. Unlike my dad, who used to insult and beat us, my mother was protective. A true wolf.How is currently your relationship with your father?Amale Elatrassi: My relationship with my father now is peaceful. He settled in Morocco now and he has another wife and children which I personally don’t aim to know them in person. He calls me once a year. After that I published the book, he called me saying that I didn’t say everything about him and that I could say more.How were you reconciled with your father?Amale Elatrassi: It took me a lot of time and hindsight. I had to work on myself to try to understand the how and the why my father damaged us this much; otherwise I would never make it.Why did you and your sister stay in Morocco?Amale Elatrassi: At a summer vacation in Morocco, my father lied to us. He told us that there was a judicial problem in France he needs to resolve with my mother and my brothers and he will leave me and my sister at our grandmother’s house for two to three months at Douar Doum in Rabat. But in fact, he was abandoning us there. His family was telling us all the time that girls shouldn’t go out and that they should stay home and learn how to cook and to manage a house until they get married. At that time, I was 12 years old. I didn’t want a husband. I just wanted to watch cartoons.How did you revolt?Amale Elatrassi: Three years after, we were watching TV. There was a Michael Jackson show. My sister innocently said how handsome he was. My uncle beat her until she fell on the ground. I knew right away that we can’t stay there. So we decided to flee.How was your experience when you left your family’s home?Amale Elatrassi: We had what mattered most: Hope and freedom. At our family’s house, we had no hope left. We knew if we stayed they will oblige us to get married and that we were not going back to France. After we ran away, we wanted to find a way to go back to France so we went to Agdal, a place where there were a lot of foreigners and diplomats who may help us return to France. We used to hang out in the Crocontic Bar with student of the mission of French-language school Descartes. They were sons of diplomats, of doctors and very important people.Did you tell your new friends that you ran away from your family’s house?Amale Elatrassi: No, we didn’t tell them the truth. We told them that my father is a doctor and that he had to travel for work, and he left us with the maid who was mean with us so we had to spend a lot of time outside. They believed us because we could speak French fluently and we wore clean clothes that we stole from rooftops.Where did you spend the nights?Amale Elatrassi: At night, we used to hide at a forest. When one of us is sleeping, the other is watching.These “sons of diplomats and doctors” are the same ones who raped you and your sister?Before answering this question, Amale stops to gently ask her 10 years old daughter to leave the room.Amale Elatrassi: Yes, the six rapists were people we used to eat lunch with. We were drinking alcohol. In the morning, we woke up with messier hair and torn clothes. We understood right away what happened. We didn’t know that these “well educated” people will end up raping us. They had immunity and they also knew that rape is a taboo in Morocco and that we were not going to talk about it.Three days later, you met your mother. How did you feel?Amale Elatrassi: We were crushed. We had no hope left. We lost so much time for nothing. And I felt so much hate toward my father but I was so happy because she was here again. I felt protected.What was the thing that helped you get over your negative feelings?Amale Elatrassi: My four children are the diamonds in my backyards. They are what helped me move on. Without them, I wouldn’t be here today.You’re not an average writer. You started writing your book in jail. How were you inspired to write all your feelings down in paper?Amale Elatrassi: After my return to France, I felt unclean and broken inside. I went to prison four times for being involved in robbery, theft, and fights. I wasn’t afraid of going to prison. It was nothing for me compared of what I went through in Morocco. I knew how the confinement felt like. I thought French prison was idyllic. I watched television, I played sports, and I took computer training.When I first went to prison, at 18 years old, a psychologist within the prison asked me how I was doing. When I told him that I was doing great he was shocked. I refused to talk to him about my past so he asked me to take a pen and papers and start writing down how I feel without showing them to anyone if I don’t want to. I thought it was not going to help but as soon as I started writing, I couldn’t stop. It was hard as I was crying while writing but I felt also released and free from my wounds.How did you decide to stop stealing?Amale Elatrassi: I was pregnant with my first child. I was so proud when I knew that it was a girl: Ines. She now is 20 years old. After her birth, I didn’t want to go back to prison because I didn’t want to lose her. My four children are my loves. They changed my whole attitude. I didn’t want to hurt them like my father did to us. I stopped also the crimes for my husband. He is a great person. He respects women. He was always there for me even at my worst.Are you planning to write other books?Amale Elatrassi: I have a publishing contract at the publishing company Archipel, an exclusive contract for three books. All of them are autobiographies. I am also planning to make a movie. The script is already written. read more

Indias central bank lowers key lending rate to 625 per cent

NEW DELHI — India’s central bank has lowered its key interest rate by a quarter of a percentage point to 6.25 per cent, a step that is expected to boost the economy.The interest rate is what the federal bank charges on lending to commercial banks. Lower interest rates help borrowers but can also spur inflation. The Reserve Bank of India judged the consumer inflation rate, at 2.2 per cent in December, safe for loosening monetary policy.In a bi-monthly review of the economy released Thursday, the central bank forecast India’s economy will expand at a 7.4 per cent pace in 2019-20, up from 7.2 per cent in this fiscal year. India’s financial year runs from April to March.The central bank said growth was mostly supported by government spending on infrastructure but investment activity was recovering.The Associated Press read more

DR of Congo UNbacked talks agree on principles for transitional government

The parties agreed to pay particular attention to security issues, especially in regard to the safety of political leaders who are expected to move to Kinshasa, and to bring the different armed forces under one joint command, according to a communiqué released on Saturday following the conclusion of the talks in South Africa. The parties will also continue discussions on the modalities to be adopted to reach the goal of inclusivity.Under the plan, a military and security committee will be set to propose measures to ensure the security of political leaders, guarantee that the different armed forces are brought under one joint control prior to the inauguration of the transition government and propose guidelines to make certain that the security services are impartial and accountable to the transitional government.A political committee will also be formed to make recommendations on how to distribute ministries among the parties and make diplomatic missions inclusive. The plans also call for a technical committee to conduct a needs analysis and propose guidelines to ensure that State corporations are accountable to the government, and a drafting committee to write the transitional Constitution and other needed legal documents.According to the communiqué, each committee will be composed of two representatives per component and one per entity and will begin work from 28 November to 6 December in Pretoria. All the negotiators are expected to reconvene in Pretoria on 9 December to finalize their work by 14 December. read more

Security Council urges parties to implement Côte dIvoire peace deal constructively

The Council’s reaction, read in a statement to the press by the President of the 15-nation body, Ambassador Jean-Marc de La Sablière of France, came after a closed-door briefing by Secretary-General Kofi Annan, who had just returned from Paris, where the accord was signed late last week.”Members of the Security Council thanked the Secretary-General for the important role that he has played in the talks, either directly or through the intermediary of his Special Representative” for West Africa, Ahmedou Ould-Abdallah, Ambassador de La Sablière said. “They expressed the wish that the United Nations support the implementation of the peace process, [and] stated their intention to consider promptly the Secretary-General’s recommendations to that end.”Ambassador de La Sablière added that Council members stressed once again the importance of the support of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) to the restoration of peace and security in Côte d’Ivoire. “They welcomed the continued efforts to deploy the ECOWAS Military Observer Group (ECOMOG) force, under Senegalese command,” he said.Council members also voiced appreciation for the work of the African Union to bring about a settlement, and thanked France for its diplomatic efforts and military deployment aimed at facilitating a political settlement of the crisis. read more

Brock prof works with parents with intellectual disabilities to keep families together

When the future of a family is at stake, assumptions about who makes a capable parent can have devastating consequences.Professor Maurice Feldman, Chair of the Department of Applied Disability Studies (ADS), has spent much of his career combating assumptions and stereotypes. “As a researcher and a clinician, I’ve been working with parents who have learning difficulties, including intellectual disabilities,” he says.Feldman is one of the most published researchers in this area and has written the only book on how to administer valid parenting capacity assessments with these parents. His evidence-based Step-by-Step Parenting Program is implemented worldwide.  “People think the issue is insignificant because parents with learning difficulties make up such a small percentage of the Canadian population,” he says. “Although they make up only three per cent of the overall population, they account for 25 per cent of Canadian child protection cases.” In such cases, the family can be torn apart, often by a system of well-meaning social service agencies, says Feldman.“Parents with learning difficulties typically appear in the media only when something goes wrong or something happens to the child,” he says.“There is an assumption that people with intellectual disabilities can’t be capable parents, so their kids are at high risk of being taken away,” he says. When that happens, Feldman is sometimes asked to do a parenting capacity assessment by the child protection agency or the parents’ lawyers. “Sometimes I’m called in by social services when, for example, hospital staff are unwilling to send a new baby home with parents who have intellectual disabilities.”According to Feldman, accounting for parental health, socioeconomic factors and social supports significantly reduces the risk of adverse child protection outcomes compared to parents without learning difficulties, but does not completely eliminate the increased risk of child removal. “This finding may be evidence that societal bias against parents with intellectual disabilities is present among child protection workers,” he says.Research from the U.S. has shown that “workers responsible for making decisions about whether or not to remove children are often unaware of existing, evidence-based interventions and therefore are making decisions based on their own assumptions that these parents are incapable of adequately raising children,” says Feldman.“I don’t want to give the impression that it is always adversarial,” he says. “Often agencies and workers strive to reunite children with parents consistent with existing legislation, but they know the families need but may not get access to interventions that will improve outcomes for the children.”Children born to parents with difficulties do not necessarily have learning difficulties themselves but may be at risk for developing problems as they grow, Feldman says. That’s why support networks and positive parenting skills are so important for these families. “Research shows that evidence-based interventions focused on improving parenting skills benefit the children,” he says.Feldman’s now world-renowned Step-by-Step Parenting Program was developed and implemented at Surrey Place in Toronto, where he ran the program for 14 years. After almost 40 years, the Surrey Place program is still going strong.  Feldman’s approach combines elements of applied behaviour analysis and developmental psychology to teach specific parenting skills, one step at a time. His research shows that using the step-by-step approach, parents with learning difficulties can quickly learn to improve their parenting skills with corresponding improvements in the children. For instance, in one randomized control trial, Feldman and his associates showed the Step-by-Step program increased the language development of young children raised by parents with intellectual disabilities by teaching their parents to provide more sensitive, responsive positive interactions.Researching service needs for families with parents who have intellectual disabilities is the focus of a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) Partnership Development grant that Feldman is currently working on with principal investigator David McConnell (University of Alberta) and co-investigators Marjorie Aunos (adjunct faculty with Brock’s ADS) and Laura Pacheco (Director of Parenting Services at Montréal West Island Integrated University Health and Social Services Centre). The team is working towards a full SSHRC Partnership grant to design a Canadian national strategy to support these families.Feldman is proud of his work with these families. “I became a scientist-practitioner to increase my impact,” he says. “Research allows me to reach far more people in need of evidence-based interventions than I would have been able to help if I remained a clinician.” read more

Miami Ohio downs Wright State 6562 with buzzerbeater

DAYTON, Ohio — Bam Bowman scored 18 points and grabbed seven rebounds, Isaiah Coleman-Lands hit a game-winning 3-pointer at the buzzer, and Miami (Ohio) beat Wright State 65-62 on Wednesday night.Coleman-Lands sank a contested 3 from the wing in between two defenders and was carried around the court by his jubilant teammates.Dalonte Brown and Abdoulaye Harouna scored nine points apiece for the Redhawks (4-4), who shot 44 per cent and made 11 of 23 3-pointers, led by Bowman’s three.Trailing 30-21 at halftime after shooting 28 per cent, the Raiders closed to 41-40 after a 13-3 run capped by Malachi Smith’s layup, then led 44-43 on Alan Vest’s free throw. It was back-and-forth with neither team leading by more than four points until Wright State’s Billy Wampler hit a 3 to tie it a 62 with six seconds left.Wampler and Skyelar Potter scored 17 apiece for the Raiders (4-5), who finished shooting 42 per cent.The Associated Press read more

Kawhi Leonards Rise To Superstardom

2016-1718.236.831.2 2015-1613.045.025.8 This season is different. Leonard’s usage has spiked to 31 percent (that’s Russell-Westbrook-before-this-season range), and he’s nearly doubled his pick-and-roll possessions, going from 14 percent of his possessions last season to 26 percent this season while remaining deadly effective. His 106.1 points per 100 possessions on those plays is among the best in the league, better even than Harden’s formidable pick-and-roll game this season (101.6), albeit on about half the number of possessions per game.16.1 pick-and-roll possessions per game for Leonard, 11.7 for Harden. Leonard still gets a lot of spot-up jumpers, but he’s now being assisted on only 37 percent of his 2-pointers, pretty much in line with LeBron James or an in-his-prime Kobe Bryant. He’s creating his own offense now, rather than waiting for the offense to come to him.Maybe most impressively, Leonard has done all this without dropping an ounce of efficiency. After Monday night, his 61.7 true shooting percentage had inched past his career-high from last season (61.6 percent). This is somewhat surprising, given that Leonard has gone from shooting 44 percent on 3-pointers last season to 39 percent this season. But he’s made up for that by adding more long twos to his game — often on quick curls around a high screen, as he did in the Houston game, but also in isolation on a variety of hesitation and pull-up moves — and making nearly half of them. These are the shots that had DeMarcus Cousins saying that he saw “flashes of Kobe” in Kawhi’s game, and it’s rare that workmanlike perimeter grinders are able to add them to their games so successfully. Guys learn to shoot corner threes much more often than they learn to Kobe-step.That ability to pick up hard-to-master skills is what makes Leonard such an intriguing prospect, even now as a credible MVP candidate. He still isn’t as natural a passer as many of the other perimeter players who are the nexus of their teams, but he’s improving. And as we’ve seen with the maturation of Westbrook as a point guard, the transcendent passing gene may come only by birthright, but you can get pretty damn far with time and stubbornness. So far, Leonard has gone from a 13 percent assist rate the last two seasons to 18 percent this season. That’s partly just a function of using more possessions, but the capacity and willingness to do that are part of his growth. And the notion that at 25 years old, Leonard is playing this well but has clear paths to improvement is downright lurid.All this newfound offensive firepower comes alongside Leonard’s reputation as an all-world defender. The game-winning block Monday night will stand out, but it’s Leonard’s body of work that speaks for itself. His defensive numbers have been a little hard to decipher this season (they dipped badly early in the season), but defensive metrics in the NBA often are. His metrics have since normalized, and while his defensive Real Plus-Minus is still just OK, he’s now back near the top of the league in points allowed per 100 possessions as the primary defender (82.1 points per 100 possessions) and is recovering on the leaderboards of other individual stats.In all likelihood, even a sustained run of games like Monday night’s won’t do much to change Leonard’s reputation as a souped-up role player. In fact, he’s averaged 33.8 points, 8.3 rebounds and 3.3 steals in four games in March and erupted in high-profile games, such as a dominating 41-point game in a win over LeBron’s Cavs in January.Yet folks are still trying to act surprised about a pull-up and a chasedown coming in quick succession against the Rockets. To change those stripes, he’ll have to take this act deep into the playoffs, into the marquee rounds against marquee opposition, and outduel his more famous counterparts.Check out our latest NBA predictions. 2014-1513.045.023.0 2013-1410.451.918.3 Kawhi Leonard creates his own offense now The San Antonio Spurs have spent years tinkering with their style in plain sight. Since they drafted Tim Duncan in 1997, the Spurs have gone through the bruising Twin Towers and Bruce Bowen bully-ball eras; the high-octane, ball-movement era featuring Tony Parker, Manu Ginobili and Boris Diaw; and, more recently, a post-heavy attack built around LaMarcus Aldridge. San Antonio’s shifting styles have kept it current with league trends and accentuated the roster’s strengths, but traditionally, that’s meant that the Spurs’ reputation has been slightly out of step with how the team is actually playing at any given moment. Now, that disconnect between the team’s rep and its play has transferred to its best player. Kawhi Leonard is staging a bona-fide MVP campaign while playing a very different brand of basketball than he did the last time he was at the center of the basketball-watching universe.On Monday night, the Spurs took down the Houston Rockets thanks to a late-game charge led by Leonard, who went for 39 points that included a contested pull-up three followed by a game-sealing block on fellow MVP candidate James Harden.That’s as good a late-game effort as you’ll see most nights, but it’s also not altogether different from what Leonard does from night to night. That some are (correctly) holding it up as the moment Leonard’s MVP campaign launched in earnest is pretty solid evidence that the image of Leonard many fans have — dutiful two-way cog in the Spurs machine, in balance with the talented Spurs roster around him — isn’t really the guy who’s out there this season.Instead, Kahwi Leonard has stopped playing quite so much like Kawhi Leonard and taken up the game of a go-to superstar. In 2013-14, the last season the Spurs won the title, Leonard’s usage percentage was just 18.3 during the regular season, which is low for a key offensive player. Of the possessions he did use, 28 percent came on spot-up shots, and an additional 22 percent came in transition; 52 percent of his 2-point shots were assisted, making him much more reliant on others for his offense than the typical perimeter star. His role was as an elite defender and a floor spacer, not a key creator in the offense. 2012-137.754.416.4 RATE SEASONASSISTASSISTED 2PUSAGE Source: Basketball-Reference.com 2011-126.6%53.2%14.5% While Leonard has steadily grown into one of the most efficient players in the league over the last few seasons, he has still carried the label of a system player. Even last season, his most-common play type was the spot-up jumper (on which he scored a phenomenal 125.1 points per 100 possessions), which has obvious value but doesn’t fit the traditional go-to guy mold. read more

You cant cheat then Queen asks as she learns to use selfservice

Before she left, she met a small selection of around 30 of Sainsbury’s 180,000 employees, including some of the 35,000 staff volunteering in their communities to celebrate the 150th anniversary, before unveiling a plaque and cutting a cake to mark the occasion. Lord Sainsbury, life president and former chief executive of the company, greeted the Queen and called her visit “very flattering”.He said: “I’m proud to say that what the company has contributed over the years has made it worthy of it.”Of course, it’s a great compliment.” Mr Corcoran, a former Captain in the Royal Signals, said that in his work for Sainsbury’s he generally found there were two types of customers: those who embraced new technology quickly and were keen to use it, and others who needed a bit more help from staff. The Queen examines a ration bookCredit:Reuters The Queen is shown a typical 2019 shopping basketCredit:Reuters Off duty, she is said to occasionally pop into shops in Ballater near Balmoral when she is staying on her Scottish estate. During her visit to Sainsbury’s in Covent Garden, the Queen was shown around mocked-up store fronts from history. The pop-up store, only a few hundred yards from where Sainsbury’s first set up in business on a stall at 173 Drury Lane in 1869, is open all week for the company’s 150th celebrations.During a half hour visit, the Queen saw a replica of the firm’s first delivery bike, used to take goods to customers in Croydon, south London, before seeing counters displaying the first three items the shops sold: butter, milk and eggs. The Queen examines a ration book A mock-up of an original Sainbury’s storeCredit:Reuters The Queen had her suspicions about the self-service check outCredit:Reuters While the Queen is not a regular visitor to supermarkets, she has previously made official visits to shops including a 2016 trip to Waitrose in Poundbury with Prince Philip, Prince Charles and the Duchess of Cornwall.  Beside one counter, Lord Sainsbury of Preston Candover, the company’s 91-year-old life president, and his wife Lady Anya, reminisced with the Queen about ration books, which the company helped to introduce during the Second World War.She recalled her ration book – “it was very small” – and told the Sainsburys how the Royal Family used to supplement their rations with eggs and cheese from the farm at Windsor. “As a Sunday treat we had some sweeties. But we were lucky we had a farm,” the Queen said. The Queen sees inside a replica of one of the original Sainsbury's stores in Covent Garden One item that caught her eye from 1953 was an empty jar of bloater paste, a fish paste made from herring.“Ghastly,” the Queen said.“I was thinking the same,” said Ms Bennett. “Disgusting.”The Queen appeared surprised by some of the items in the modern day shopping basket, which included fish pie and curry ready meals.When Ms Bennett showed her a packet of sachets of porridge and explained people liked the sachets, the Queen said: “Porridge? Tastes have changed.” The Queen sees inside a replica of one of the original Sainsbury’s stores in Covent GardenCredit:Reuters A mock-up of an original Sainbury's store The Queen had her suspicions about the self-service check out As Queen, she has had little opportunity to get to grips with the mundane reality of modern supermarket shopping.So when she was taught to use a self-service scanner today, she only had one question on her mind: could it be tricked?The Queen, who was visiting a Sainsbury’s store to celebrate the chain’s 150th anniversary, was given a demonstration of a new till and weighing scale, asking: “And you can’t trick it? You can’t cheat then?”Reassured by Damien Corcoran, a regional manager for Sainsbury’s stores in the north east of England, that the weighing scale would catch out any unscrupulous shoppers, the Queen was told how people put items from their baskets on the scales, key in details, and normally pay with credit cards.When the manager claimed many people liked the convenience of being able to do it themselves, she replied: “I’m sure they do. Everybody wants to hurry.”Mr Corcoran also showed her how some shoppers now dispensed with tills altogether, choosing instead to pay via a mobile telephone app. “That’s an interesting tool,” the Queen, who is 93, replied. She was shown how tastes have changed since her Coronation when one Sainsbury’s staff member, Lynn Bennett, showed her a typical shopping basket from 1953 and one from the present day. The Queen is shown a typical 2019 shopping basket “I think if I had seen the Queen in one of my stores in the north east of England I would have made sure I had assisted her,” he said. read more

France wants Mens WCH 2017

The French Handball Federation have launched their campaign for the Men’s World Championship 2017, four years before the starting whistle is due to be blown. The 2017 World Championship, which was awarded to them in December 2011 in Sao Paulo, recently had its launch ceremony. IHF President Dr Hassan Moustafa was the guest of honour at the launch ceremony in Paris, hosted by Joel Delplanque, President of the French Handball Federation and member of the IHF Executive Committee.In two presentations, the significance of the World Championship 2017 (played 14-29 January) for handball in France was highlighted. Joel Delplanque: “The FFHB will put all their efforts in promoting handball and generalize it for a wider audience and economic partners. Delivering a World Championship that gains support and enthusiasm all around France will bring new equipment and infrastructure for handball.”In the first presentation, the agency Sportlab presented the results of a nationwide survey of those associated with handball, the “handball family” and sports experts, regarding handball, the organization and the expectations of the World Championship 2017.Some results of the survey worth mentioning: Handball is the mixed sport (male and female competitions) most recognized by people in France, approximately 4.5 million French people are interested in the Men’s World Championships, of those, 1.2 million want to watch matches live in the arenas. 44% of the French population have watched handball at the Olympic Games. People would be willing to spend money and travel distances up to 100 kilometres to watch matchesIn the second presentation some key figures regarding the tournament were revealed:The 2017 Men’s World Championship is planned to be hosted by eleven cities all over France, the organizers expect up to 500,000 spectators, 3000 people, including volunteers, will be involved in the organization. One goal is to get the whole of France involved in this competition, as the host cities are spread all over the country: Lille, Dunkerque, Nanterre, Paris, Strasbourg, Orleans, Nantes, Albertville, Bordeaux, Montpellier, AixThe French federation plans for all locations to be accessible within two hours for the spectators and, for the 24 teams and officials, they also plan for travel times between the team hotel and the competition/training venues to be less than 15 minutes.Since being awarded the World Championship in Sao Paulo, the organizers have installed a clear communication concept. The concept combines a number of side activities aiding in the preparation and the promotion of the World Championship, for example school and university tournaments, a “World Championship” for disabled persons, and a big screen road show all over France.article: ihf.info French handballMen’s Handball World Championship 2017 ← Previous Story EHF CL (W): FTC – 3 games, 3 wins! Buducnost with first victory Next Story → Croatian “wunderkind” was “match winner” in Swiss derby! read more

ASOBAL La Rioja defeated in Cuenca – Huesca win point in Leon

15Bidasoa Irún20020 9Cuatro Rayas Valladolid21012 12Ángel Ximénez Puente Genil20111 Fraikin BM GranollersCuatro Rayas Valladolid28-25 ← Previous Story Women’s EHF Champions League – FINAL4 FROM MAY 2015! Next Story → “EIN LOWE”: Bjarte Myrhol stays in Rhein Neckar Lowen until 2015! 14BM. Aragón20020 Globalcaja C. EncantadaNaturhouse La Rioja28-27 7Globalcaja C. Encantada21012 Helvetia AnaitasunaBM. Aragón30-24 8Naturhouse La Rioja21012 16Villa de Aranda Top Rivera20020 BM GuadalajaraFertiberia Puerto Sagunto24-22 1FC Barcelona22004 4Reale Ademar León21103 Reale Ademar LeónBM. Huesca25-25 ASOBALhandball 2Frigoríficos Morrazo Cangas22004 5BM. Huesca21103 STANDINGS: 10Helvetia Anaitasuna21012 11BM Guadalajara21012 6Juanfersa Grupo Fegar21103 Spanish ASOBAL Round 2 have some interesting matches. EHF CL team Naturhouse La Rioja is defeated in Quenca 28:27, while Ademar Leon took only a point at home against Huesca 25:25.Here are the complete results of Round 2: Ángel Ximénez Puente GenilJuanfersa Grupo Fegar23-23 13Fertiberia Puerto Sagunto20020 Bidasoa IrúnFrigoríficos Morrazo Cangas22-25 Villa de Aranda Top RiveraFC Barcelona20-44 3Fraikin BM Granollers22004 read more

The Criminal Assets Bureau has a really good rating on eBay

first_imgTHE CRIMINAL ASSETS Bureau has got a ‘thumbs up’ from its first eBay client.The agency tested out the online auction site last month as an avenue to sell off assets it seizes from criminals in the State.The experiment involved a ladies Rolex watch that had been confiscated from a Limerick man in September.The new owner was delighted with the whole process, giving user ‘ ‘proceedsofcrimeact1996‘ some stellar feedback.“Great communication, very fast delivery. Great Seller, will buy again AAAA+,” they said, keeping the CAB’s rating at 100 per cent positive.But, as of today, no further items have been put up for sale.The used Rolex Oyster Perpetual Datejust, worth about €9,000, was sold to the highest bidder for €7,000.CAB had described the item as a Christmas present from 2011. It came with the original box, documentation and a 24-month jewellers guarantee from Keanes of Cork, Limerick and Killarney.As with all CAB auctions of seized items, proceeds of the sale boost the Exchequer.Read: CAB selling criminal’s Rolex…on eBayRelated: Limerick criminal’s Rolex sells for €7,000 on eBayToday: Cocaine worth €385,000 and parts of 8 stolen vehicles seizedlast_img read more

Eddie Howe aiming for Bournemouths first win at Anfield

first_imgBournemouth manager Eddie Howe has urged his team to rewrite history by winning at Anfield when they face Liverpool on Saturday.The Cherries are still waiting for their first win at Anfield, while the Reds have not lost at home in the Premier League for more than a year.But with Klopp’s men currently dip in form following two consecutive draws, Howe feels his side can seize the opportunity to further damage their title aspirations with a rare win.When asked about Bournemouth’s poor record at Anfield, Howe told Sky: “These things have always faced us before.“In the Premier League, every game when we first came into the league was a case of rewriting history and proving we could do things for the first time.“I think we tend to look at these things as a nice thing to do, to try and write a new history for the club all the time.“The Chelsea result was where everything came together with the result. There have been other games where we’ve performed really well and just missed out.“We’re going to have to defend well for long periods, but if we can show that mentality and desire to defend our goal then I believe we will have moments in the game to show what we were capable of going the other way.”Top 5 Premier League players to watch for next weekend Tomás Pavel Ibarra Meda – September 11, 2019 With the international activity cooling down for the next month, we go back to the Premier League’s Top 5 players to watch this weekend.After…Bournemouth will be without a key player on Saturday 🤞https://t.co/JRlz5GE5m4— Anfield HQ (@AnfieldHQ) February 5, 2019Bournemouth will be without both David Brooks [ankle] and Callum Wilson [knee] for the trip to Anfield, while Jefferson Lerma faces a late fitness test.“David has been to see a specialist and had scans, so I think around the four-week mark for him,” said Howe.“Callum, it’s just a clean out of his knee, he’s probably around the same mark. We’re not going to be able to get them back earlier than that.“[They are] big misses for us. Big misses for the team, for the group, they are big personalities for the group so we’re keen to get them back fit.“In the meantime, I believe we have the squad strength to cover those players.”last_img read more

Security beefed up ahead of 21 August grenade attack verdict

first_imgSecurity has been beefed up in the tribunal area ahead of 21 August grenade attack verdict. Photo : Prothom AloSecurity has been tightened in and around the tribunal area in Old Dhaka ahead of the 21 August grenade attack on an Awami League rally in the capital in 2004.The Speedy Trial Tribunal-1 at Old Dhaka’s Nazimuddin Road is scheduled to deliver verdict in the two cases filed over the 21 August grenade attack.The vehicular movement on the roads adjacent to in the area have been stopped. Many of the shops were seen shut there.Judge Shahed Nuruddin of the Speedy Trial Tribunal-1 may deliver the verdict.At least 24 leaders and activists, including AL’s women affairs secretary and late president Zillur Rahman’s wife Ivy Rahman, were killed and Sheikh Hasina among 300 others injured in the grisly grenade attack carried out on 21 August 2004 on an anti-terrorism rally arranged by Awami League on the Bangabandhu Avenue during the BNP-Jamaat regime.last_img read more

AAPM Future Trends in Medical Physics

first_imgRelated content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Find more news and videos from AAPM. Women’s Health View all 62 items AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Videos | Radiation Oncology | July 28, 2015 AAPM: Future Trends in Medical Physics Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Find more SCCT news and videos CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Find more SCCT news and videos Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Conference Coverage View all 396 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Technology Reports View all 9 items Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing Find more news and videos from AAPM. SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients Firstcenter_img Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Recent Videos View all 606 items Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy AAPM: Future Trends in Medical PhysicsAmerican Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) President John Boone, Ph.D., discusses the impact of imaging in medical physics, as well as key topics addressed at this year’s AAPM meeting.Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 11:06Loaded: 1.84%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -11:06 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) President John Boone, Ph.D., discusses the impact of imaging in medical physics, as well as key topics addressed at this year’s meeting, with Imaging Technology News Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Find more SCCT news and videos Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Information Technology View all 220 items Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting.last_img read more

Tourists evacuated in Croatia amid forest fires

first_img<< Previous PostNext Post >> Share The Canadian Press Tourists evacuated in Croatia amid forest fires Tuesday, June 20, 2017 center_img Posted by Tags: Croatia, Travel Alert ZAGREB, Croatia — Authorities in Croatia say that hundreds of tourists and local residents have been evacuated amid big forest fires that have engulfed the central Adriatic coast.About 300 firefighters are tackling the fires, which have been spreading because of strong winds near the resorts of Makarska and Tucepi. The fires started over the weekend and spread from the mountain national park of Biokovo.Around 800 foreign guests were evacuated on Monday from three hotels, as well as hundreds of residents whose houses were endangered. There have been no reports of casualties.About 150 soldiers have joined the firefighters, along with three firefighting planes whose mission was made difficult because of strong winds.Such fires have been quite common along the Dalmatian coast, with human factors often blamed for triggering the blazes.last_img read more