Spend The Next 36 Minutes With Phish’s Glorious ‘Tahoe Tweezer’

first_imgOn an unassuming night at the Lake Tahoe Outdoor Arena at Harvey’s in Stateline, NV, the band Phish laid down what was, and still is, their best jam of the 3.0 era. Now known as the “Tahoe Tweezer,” the performance not only introduced the call-and-response “woo”-ing to Phish crowds, but remains one of the most cohesive sessions in all of Phish’s history.Coming on the second night of a two night run, Phish opened their second set with “Tweezer” and never looked back. The song moves from a funk jam into ambient territory, before new ideas take the band members on various musical journeys. The jam gets dark at times, light at others, and does a great job featuring all four members to create something wholly larger than the sum of its parts.Considering that this one improvised piece of music helped launch the career of pianist Holly Bowling (who transcribed the entire thing for piano), it’s safe to say that the song truly lives up to its hype. Woo! Without further ado, on its third anniversary, enjoy the famed “Tahoe Tweezer” heard ’round the world.[Video courtesy of madpicken]Setlist: Phish at Lake Tahoe Outdoor Arena at Harvey’s, Stateline, NV – 7/31/13Set 1: Chalk Dust Torture, Camel Walk, Sparkle > Back on the Train, It’s Ice > Brian and Robert, Yarmouth Road, Kill Devil Falls, Lawn Boy, Ocelot, StashSet 2: Tweezer[1] > Tela > Twist > Architect > Bouncing Around the Room > Run Like an Antelope[1]Encore: Julius > Tweezer Reprise[1][1] Included call and response “Wooo” with the crowdNotes: Tweezer, Antelope, and Tweezer Reprise included a call and response with crowd cheering back “Wooooo.”last_img read more

Wilco Brings Schmilco To The Beacon For Night Three Of Four [Photos]

first_imgWilco, currently on their Schmilco World Tour, played their third of four nights at the Beacon Theatre on Tuesday night in New York City with support from Jake Xerxes Fussell. Sprinkling in new tunes from their 2016 Schmilco release, the Chicago-based rock band also included some of the career-spanning favorites, like “Jesus, etc.” “Heavy Metal Drummer,” “California Stars,” and more in their delivery of a 27-song setlist. With a double encore, fans of Wilco are left with only one more night of their music at the Beacon Theatre.Photographer Stephen Olker was there to capture the glory, which you can enjoy in the gallery below.Setlist: Wilco | The Beacon Theatre | NYC | 3/21/17Set: On and On and On, Normal American Kids, If I Ever Was A Child, Cry All Day, I Am Trying To Break Your Heart, Art Of Almost, She’s A Jar, Misunderstood, Someone To Lose, Reservations, Impossible Germany, Jesus, etc., We Aren’t The World (Safety Girl), Laminated Cat (Loose Fur Cover), Via Chicago, Locator, Heavy Metal Drummer, I’m The Man Who Loves You, Hummingbird, The Late GreatsE: I’m Always In Love, Random Name Generator, Box Full of Letters, Monday, Outtasite (Outta Mind)E2: California Stars, Forget The Flowers Load remaining imageslast_img read more

Radically rethinking education

first_imgJust as Amazon has gone from selling books to exploring package delivery by drone, higher education in the digital age is radically rethinking the models by which it delivers its content, the leader of a higher education technology association told a Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE) audience on Wednesday.The upshot is that more and more people across the world will be engaged by education in ways previously unimagined, said Diana Oblinger, president and CEO of EDUCAUSE, and a Dean’s Distinguished Visiting Fellow at the School.“It’s higher education in the connected age, where we can connect with anyone and anything, anytime,” she said.Oblinger spoke on “The Digital Ecosystem and Higher Education’s Future” as part of the Askwith Forum series at the School. Joining her at Longfellow Hall to discuss the issue was Christopher Dede, Timothy E. Wirth Professor in Learning Technologies at HGSE.Under Oblinger’s leadership, EDUCAUSE, a nonprofit that advances higher education through information technology, has increased its membership to 2,400 colleges, universities, and corporations. Oblinger said EDUCAUSE’s online events reach 20,000 participants annually.Oblinger launched the Next Generation Learning Challenges program, which, with the support of such organizations as the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and the Hewlett Foundation, has awarded nearly $55 million in grants toward applied technology in schools to boost college readiness. She most recently edited “Game Changers: Education and Information Technologies,” which spotlights the ways in which new educational models made possible by advances in technology enable more learners to be reached, with greater impact.Christopher Dede, Timothy E. Wirth Professor in Learning Technologies, discusses the role of information technology in higher education. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff PhotographerAt the Askwith Forum, Oblinger described the technology-driven revolution that is transforming college.She cited a new application called zSpace, a desktop virtual-reality platform with stylus and eyewear, which turns using a computer into a 3-D exercise. “If you were studying anatomy, you could look at [2-D] images or have this immersive experience,” she said. “Which one do you think is the more engaging?”New simulation- or gamelike learning spaces — echoing the SimCity video game — will deepen learning by placing students in complex environments in which they can track data while interacting with others, she said. In the “digital ecosystem” of the future, she said, expect to see “more and more of these gaming environments — probably more accurately termed ‘experiential learning spaces’ — because they do situate you in a very immersive, engaging kind of experience.”Oblinger drew on the Amazon analogy to describe the “radically different” alternative models that are changing assumptions of how education is delivered.She cited the new Minerva Project, which offers a liberal arts education to students using an online learning platform. The for-profit venture aims to offer an accredited education at the relatively low cost of $10,000 a year, admitting all students who qualify. “Rather than having the campus experience, students are buying into the notion that they will have a global experience,” she said.“Five years from now, 10 years from now, 20 years from now, how many of the people in this room might opt for a different kind of education?” she asked. “How many students around the world from places that can’t come here will have a very high-quality education because you can mix and match components in a different way?”She spoke of working learners, or “plate-spinners,” who juggle work and children and need education for their life and job, and who constitute a market three times as large as the traditional post-secondary education market.College for America, a branch of Southern New Hampshire University, was designed to serve people who are working on factory floors or in entry-level corporate jobs, she said. Under this model, she said, the college recruits not students but employers, who buy seats for their workers. Teaching is done at the workplace, with coaches. The pricing is $2,500 for “all you can eat” in a certain period of time.“The first graduate of this program was a guy who was older, a factory worker in a Slim Jim plant,” she said. “He received his associate’s degree by working really, really hard for three months. That’s an affordable education for someone we might not ever have been able to reach with some other programs.” The employer, meanwhile, creates “a workplace that’s full of opportunity rather than one that has a revolving door.”She also touched on MOOCs, or massive open online courses, describing a master’s program in computer science offered by Georgia Tech as “an interesting marriage between massive and intensive.” The master’s program, offered for $7,000 with an open-admission policy for anyone qualified, currently has 2,300 students, many of them “very impressive” and doing work in artificial intelligence and other innovative fields. The student-teacher ratio is 200-1, “so they have a lot of T.A.s,” she said. “The real action is in problem-solving and mentored learning.”In the “changing ecosystem of higher education,” Oblinger said, “it’s not either/or. There are a lot of different niches where different kinds of programs are emerging.”Oblinger was asked to predict how the higher ed “digital ecosystem” might look in a decade.“I think it will be a highly immersive environment,” she said. “The place where I put the emphasis would be on the connectedness of the environment. ‘In class’ is being connected to ‘out of class,’ the physical to the virtual, the student who is in school to someone who is out of school. Literally anything and everything is connected.“It’s not just about digital. We are all present, and you’ve got millions of minds in the world. It’s higher education in the connected age, where we can connect with anyone and anything, anytime, for different purposes,” she said. “If we’re smart about how to marry the digital with the best of what we do face-to-face, education will move to a new level for everyone.”last_img read more

Culturalist Challenge! Who Should Play Cher in the Clueless Musical?

first_img View Comments The Broadway.com staff is crazy for Culturalist, the website that lets you choose and rank your own top 10 lists. Every week, we’re challenging you with a new Broadway-themed topic to rank. We’ll announce the most popular choices on the new episode of The Broadway.com Show every Wednesday.Last week, we were so excited about the release of Magic Mike XXL, we asked you to rank the Broadway studs you’d love to see headline the forthcoming musical version of Magic Mike. The results are in, and Hedwig hunk Darren Criss came out on top! This week, after hearing the news that the Clueless musical is definitely in the works, we started dreaming about stars who could play Valley girl Cher in the new adaptation. Broadway.com Features Editor Lindsay Champion posted her top 10 picks here!STEP 1—SELECT: Visit Culturalist to see all of your options. Highlight your 10 favorites and click the “continue” button.STEP 2—RANK: Reorder your 10 choices by dragging them into the correct spot on your list. Click the “continue” button.STEP 3—PREVIEW: You will now see your complete top 10 list. If you like it, click the “publish” button.Once your list is published, you can see the overall rankings of everyone on the aggregate list.Pick your favorites, then tune in for the results on the next episode of The Broadway.com Show!last_img read more

Treat turfgrass diseases now

first_imgFall is a great time to guard against spring and summer diseases on warm-season grasses. Follow these tipsApplying nitrogen late in the season or excess nitrogen, especially with a potassium deficiency, can encourage the development of disease. An integrated management program to improve the lawn’s health includes the following steps: Spring dead spot, or SDS, is one of the most common and important diseases on bermudagrass in Georgia. It is difficult to manage without an integrated approach. The disease is most common on intensively maintained turf like golf courses or lawns. SDS causes dead patchesThe characteristic dead patches appear in the spring when the grass is breaking dormancy, and the problem can persist well into summer. The fungus that causes the disease attacks the roots and stolons in the fall and winter. This makes the grass more vulnerable to winter freeze damage, which leads to the dead patches of grass. But maintaining a disease free lawn in the coming years can only be accomplished by eliminating the stress that allowed the disease organisms to attack the lawn in the first place. Lawns are stressed by poor soil conditions combined with an imbalance of nutrients. Compaction, poor drainage and thatch thicker than one inch are linked to SDS outbreaks. • When planting new lawns, use cold tolerant cultivars.• Aerate and remove thatch regularly.• Irrigate deeply and less frequently. (Once per week in the absence of adequate rain.)• Mow at the recommended height. Low-mowing height stresses lawns.• Monitor pH and nutrient levels on a regular basis with soil tests. Keep potassium and phosphorus in balance with nitrogen.• Maintain a pH between 5.5 and 6.0 if disease has been a problem. The pH can be lowered by using ammonium sulfate as a nitrogen source.• Apply moderate levels of potassium in September and October to increase cold hardiness. If a deficiency of potassium is indicated on a soil test, two applications of potassium sulfate or potassium chloride can be applied at a 3 to 4 week interval for a total of 1 lb. of K2O per 1,000 sq. ft. Excess potassium should be avoided as it can also encourage disease.• Do not apply nitrogen after August. Nitrogen should be added in recommended amounts in late spring and early summer. Use moderate amounts of nitrogen during the summer so that excess nitrogen is not carried over into the fall. • Apply fungicides in late September or October if SDS was a problem the previous spring. Late September through October is the best time to apply preventative fungicide applications if SDS has been a problem this past season. But this won’t provide complete control. Most infections can be eventually eliminated over a period of years by combining fall fungicide applications with sound cultural practices. Other warm-season grasses, such as zoysia, centipede and St. Augustine, will also benefit from these general recommendations to prevent diseases like take-all and Rhizoctonia large patch. Follow recommendations for fertilizer applications for the particular grass species. A pH of approximately 6.5 is generally optimum for warm-season grasses.See these sites for more helpFor more information on maintaining turfgrass in Georgia, see the website www.Georgiaturf.com. For fungicide recommendations, contact your local University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agent or consult the Georgia Pest Management Handbook for Homeowners at www.ent.uga.edu/pmh/.last_img read more

Long Island Press 2015 High School Journalism Awards Honor Outstanding High School Students

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York The 2015 Long Island Press High School Journalism Awards Program was a resounding success yet again, culminating in its annual awards gala May 27 at Hofstra University’s John Cranford Adams Playhouse attended by hundreds of high school students, faculty and parents from across Long Island.It was a celebration that will undoubtedly be remembered for a long, long time.The annual awards competition and gala, now in its eighth year, recognizes outstanding high school journalism in print, video and online, including reporting, writing, design, artwork and illustration across more than 100 individual categories, ranging from “Best Arts Feature” to Best School Spirit Video.” Special awards are also presented for Story of the Year, Student Journalist of the Year, Advisor of the Year and Newspaper of the Year.With nearly 1,600 entries from more than two dozen high schools throughout Nassau and Suffolk, the 2015 contest was unprecedented in its scope and quality of submissions. As always, Long Island Press staffers spent weeks judging these entries and were impressed by the students’ exceptional depth and caliber of work.All Smiles: (L-R) Bay Shore High School ‘Maroon Echo’ Advisor Walt Fishon, Massapequa High School ‘The Chief’ Advisor Elyn Coyle, Commack High School ‘The Courant’ Advisor Christina Semple and New Hyde Park Memorial High School ‘The Chariot’ Advisor Mike Stencel were all crowned Advisors of the Year at the 2015 Long Island Press High School Journalism Awards Gala at Hofstra University on May 27, 2015! CLICK HERE TO VIEW PICTURES FROM THE 2015 LONG ISLAND PRESS HIGH SCHOOL JOURNALISM AWARDS GALA AT HOFSTRA UNIVERSITY!“Submissions ran the gamut—from colorful arts and entertainment coverage and insightful enterprise and investigative articles to emotionally moving first-person accounts of everything from protesting war in the Middle East to what it’s like to come face-to-face with racism,” wrote Press/Morey Publishing Editor in Chief Christopher Twarowski in a special letter to students published within a program booklet distributed at the event. “Students provided in-depth analysis of such hot-button national issues as Common Core and police brutality to First Amendment rights and terrorism. They wrote about the environment, school budgets, pay equality, standardized testing, sexism and transgender rights. They wrote about government, sports, fashion. They wrote about food, technology, health, humor, the prom and war.”“From breathtaking photo spreads and smart, gripping headlines to elements such as layout, flow, placement of graphics and artwork, use of pull-quotes and headlines—entrants in the design categories were likewise impressive,” he continued. “So were students’ video submissions, which included inspirational recoveries from rare diseases, impressive school spirit montages and introspective vignettes about everyday school life.”“Of course, all of these topics, no matter how far-reaching, have local consequences and ramifications, and students did an outstanding job documenting them,” added Twarowski. “Their coverage of the Opt-Out movement, school speed cameras and the high-stress environment consuming students throughout all grade levels added perspectives all-too-easily ignored by some local news outlets.“Journalism is a challenging and rewarding field,” wrote Evan Cornog, Ph.D., dean of The Lawrence Herbert School of Communication at Hofstra University in another letter to students within the booklet. “Challenging because it is hard to root out the truth, and when you succeed there will always be some who will not thank you; rewarding because you have the power to bring injustices to light and help build a better world.”The gala kicked off with an introduction from Press/Morey Publishing Associate Publisher Beverly Fortune, followed by opening remarks by Press Publisher Jed Morey and a keynote address from Dean Cornog.The program and this magnificent awards celebration, in which students from throughout the participating schools proudly walked onstage to accept their various awards and pose for photographs with fellow classmates, winners and advisors, would have not been possible, of course, without the continued tremendous support of its chief sponsor, Hofstra University and The Lawrence Herbert School of Communication.The annual awards gala was once again emceed by award-winning journalist, broadcaster, Press Club of Long Island board member and Long Island Press High School Awards Program Coordinator (and all-around superhero) David North, who interspersed the hundreds of students’ names and their respective honors with knee-slapping jokes and observations. His infectious charm, passion and wit kept the night moving along smoothly, occasionally handing the microphone over to a host of Press staffers for truly moving remarks.Night To Remember: (L-R) Long Island Press Associate Publisher Beverly Fortune, High School Journalism Awards Program Coordinator (broadcaster, emcee and all-around superhero) David North, and Hofstra University’s Lawrence Herbert School of Communication Dean Evan Cornog were among the all-star speakers and presenters at the 2015 Long Island Press High School Journalism Awards Gala at Hofstra University on May 27, 2015! REPORTING & WRITING AWARDSANDREA REBELLO COMMUNITY SERVICE AWARD1. Sanskriti BimalMineola High School, The Question Mark“Advocating Education For The Underprivileged Girl Child”2. Steven MolinaBellport High School, The Clipper“Students Can Make A Difference”3. Alexandra DoulosMassapequa High School, The Chief“The Art Of Affability: Massapequa Installs New ‘Koda Benches’”Honorable Mention. Kelly ChuW.T. Clarke High School, Vanguard“Dots On Our Doors”ARTS FEATURE1. Debbie SoufianGreat Neck North High School, Guide Post“The Art-icle”2. Thomas FitzgeraldNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Kanye West – The Ascension Of Yeezus”3. Rohit BachaniW.T. Clarke High School, Vanguard“Go-Fish!”ARTS REVIEW – THEATER1. Kaitlyn LuceyMassapequa High School, The Chief“My Fair Lady Review”2. Arianne RogersSmithtown High School East, The Matador“Les Miz: Back In Show Biz”3. Giavanna TimsBellport High School, The Clipper“Everything’s Coming Up Gypsy”ARTS REVIEW – ART1. Debbie SoufianGreat Neck North High School, Guide Post“The Art-icle”2. Sabrina WongJericho High School, JerEcho“Scholastic Art and Writing 2015”3. Kennedy RoseBellport High School, The Clipper“Bellport Students Shine At Recent Art Shows”ARTS REVIEW – VIDEO GAMES1. Claire NuñezSmithtown High School East, The Matador“Virtually Living The Sim-ple Life”2. Catherine SangiovanniCommack High School, The Courant“Game on: Xbox One Vs. PlayStation 4”ARTS REVIEW – BOOK REVIEW1. Cassie SlibaBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Teen Heroes Make Dystopian YA Big”2. Alasia PalmerBellport High School, The Clipper“Series Review: Heroes Of Olympus”3. Nelson Gomez and Nicholas PetrilloMassapequa High School, The Chief“New Harper Lee Novel To Be Released For A New Century”ARTS REVIEW – LOCAL MUSIC1. Tali Zingman and Elaine ChenLynbrook High School, Horizon“A Lynbrook Voice On His Way To ‘The Voice’”2. Sydney Sirota“Commack High School, The Courant“#MACKAPELLA Takeover”3. Tim KeuchlerMassapequa High School, The Chief“Aspiring Musician Rebecca White Takes Center Stage”ARTS REVIEW – NATIONAL MUSIC1. Alejandro SerranoBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Groove To The Guru, But Quickly”2. Kennedy RoseBellport High School, The Clipper“Concert Review: Monumentour”3. Nia TuckerBellport High School, The Clipper“Drake Mixtape Is Fire?”ARTS REVIEW – ALBUM1. Elma ThorarinssonNorth Shore High School, Viking View“Everything Is Still In Transit”2. Rebecca Simon and Evan SilveraJericho High School, JerEcho“‘Hozier’ Album Review”3. Tyler BaronNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Kendrick Spits Fire On Charts”ARTS REVIEW – FILM1. Shanon ThomasNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“A Timely Cry For Justice”2. Shaheer Ilyas and Roby DanielNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Wrestling With Demons”3. Abha JapiNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Students Can’t Get Enough Of The DUFF”ARTS REVIEW — TV1. Kaylie FelsbergBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Break Out Laughing Over ‘Kimmy Schmidt’2. Sotiris GeorgakopoulousSmithtown High School East, The Matador“ABC’s Killer New Show”3. Gabby DeVeglioEast Islip High School, The Broadcaster“American Horror Story: Season 4: Freak Show”ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT1. Mikaela AdwarJericho High School, JerEcho“Star Struck With ‘The Fault In Our Stars’”2. Gregory KothesakisNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Netflix Takes The House With New Season”3. Kennedy RoseBellport High School, The Clipper“Concert Review: Monumentour”AURA DIAZ AWARD / FIRST PERSON1. Sharon AhmedBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Middle East Atrocities Spur Student To Action”2. Christopher SumanoEast Islip High School, The Broadcaster“True Colors Of Racism in America”3. Olivia PumiliaShoreham-Wading River High School, Wildcat Pause“From Student To Jail Bird: My Trip To The County Jail”BUSINESS1. Erin-Marie DeytiquezW.T. Clarke High School, Vanguard“Watch Your Dietect!”2. Nicholas CristofariNorth Shore High School, Viking View“Apple On A Diet: How Thin Can It Get?”3. Gabby GartenJericho High School, JerEcho“Students Race To Use Uber”COLUMN – SCHOOL1. Nelson GomezMassapequa High School, The Chief“Commissioner King Resigns, Leaving Behind Uncertain Future”2. Nelson GomezMassapequa High School, The Chief“District Debate Shifts From Budget to Declining Enrollment”3. Matthew WiglerGreat Neck North High School, Guide Post“S.O. What’s Happening?”COLUMN – GENERAL1. Binita ShahW.T. Clarke High School, Vanguard“Binita’s Bollywood Binge”2. Sally BishopGreat Neck North High School, Guide Post“Sincerely, Sally”3. Meg TohillEast Islip High School, The Broadcaster“Springing Into 2015”COMMUNITY SERVICE1. Victoria PonzoNorth Shore High School, Viking View“The ‘Ice-Bucket’ Comparison?”2. Ashley Dominquez-BonillaFreeport High School, Flashings“Ripples Of Hope Change The World”3. Judy MermelsteinCommack High School, The Courant“Helping The Community ‘Grow’”Deadline / Breaking NewsDEADLINE/BREAKING NEWS1. Gabriel AjzenmanLynbrook High School, Horizon“Ebola Epidemic Scares America”2. David MarquesMassapequa High School, The Chief“Nassau Cuts School Zone Speed Cameras; Lights Dim On Plan”3. Ava GerardiShoreham-Wading River High School, Wildcat Pause“Locker Move Frustrating”EDITORIAL1. Gibran Caroline BoyceHalf Hollow Hills High School East, Thunderbird“Three High School Football Teams Deal With Tragedy”2. Maroon Echo StaffBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Lack Of Diversity In AP/IB Classes Should Be Addressed”3. Natalie Metaxas and Ashley RadparvarGreat Neck North High School, Guide Post“S.O.S. Stamp Put Social Media 2014”EDITORIAL – NATIONAL/INTERNATIONAL1. Matthew SwickleJericho High School, JerEcho“Feelings Of Hope For Greece”2. Pavithran RavindranW.T. Clarke High School, Vanguard“Je Suis Charlie”3. Sotiris GeorgakopoulosSmithtown High School East, The Matador“CIA’s Inhumane Torture Needs To Stop”EDITORIAL – GENERAL1. Brandan LawrenceMassapequa High School, The Chief“Pressure For Perfection In Women Simply Artificial”2. Gibran BoyceHalf Hollow Hills High School East, Thunderbird“From Tragedy To Triumph”3. Camryn GarrettBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“When Making A Film, Remember I Exist, Too”EDUCATION – NATIONAL ISSUES1. Lily SaeliSouthold High School, The Sentinel“Common Core Commotion”2. Alechia CacaceBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Recent Grads Report High School Students Are Prepped For College”3. Alexandra DoulosMassapequa High School, The Chief“The (Once Again) Redesigned SAT: What You Need To Know”EDUCATION – LOCAL ISSUES1. Shaheer Ilyas and Roby DanielNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“SFT Contract Negotiations Continue”2. Teena ThomasNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“A Feud Worth Fighting For”3. Alejandro SerranoBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“District Wants Albany To Reconsider Field Tests”ENERGY REPORTING1. Sarah RiordanCommack High School, The Courant“Unlikely Union: Food And Genetics”2. Ariel AvgiNorth Shore High School, Viking View“The Weather. Brought To You By N.S.H.S.?”ENTERTAINMENT & LIFESTYLE1. Nicole LamannaNorth Shore High School, Viking View“Writers, Writers Everywhere”2. Daisy Rymer and Althea MignoneSouthold High School, The Sentinel“Netflix Hidden Gems”3. Sakshi SharmaHalf Hollow Hills High School East, Thunderbird“BMWi8”ENVIRONMENTAL STORY1. Andrea ParedesBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“You Better Bee-Lieve It: Bee Population Is Declining”2. Mary BertschiSouthold High School, The Sentinel“Gardening: A Natural Alternative”3. Mary BertschiSouthold High School, The Sentinel“Another Inconvenient Truth”FASHION FEATURE1. Rachel LeinerCalhoun High School, Hoofbeats“Fashion And Movies: A Heavenly Match”2. Katie McMahonMassapequa High School, The Chief“Haute or Horrible? The Question of Couture Raises Discussion”3. Jasmine BurgosLynbrook High School, Horizon“The Fashion Superbowl”FEATURE – GENERAL1. Elise AmbosBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Frazzled”2. Sarah QadirCommack High School, The Courant“Hometown Hero”3. Ariel AvgiNorth Shore High School, Viking View“Easy As Pie: The American Road Test”FEATURE – LOCAL1. Brianna MinneciShoreham-Wading River High School, Wildcat Pause“Fall Farming Causes Frenzy”2. Nicole BienLynbrook High School, Horizon“This Could Be YOUtube”3. Jaclyn AngeloMassapequa High School, The Chief“Student Shows Community That ‘Everybody Deserves Music’”FOOD – COMMENTARY1. Jenna BarboneSmithtown High School East, The Matador“Goodbye Junk Food And Hello Healthy Eating”2. Camila Cabrera SalazarEast Islip High School, The Broadcaster“Running On Dunkin’”3. Lauren PellerHalf Hollow Hills High School East, Thunderbird“‘Eggs-Ploring’ New Cholesterol Findings”FOOD – RESTAURANT REVIEW1. Jasmine GarciaNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Brewing Up A Conversation”2. Megan Konfino and Marlie AllenCommack High School, The Courant“Sushi Standoff”3. Alexandra Kessel and Brianna MinneciShoreham-Wading River High School, Wildcat Pause“Local Tastes Of Mexico”FORMAT BUSTER1. Maroon Echo StaffBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Spanish Pages”2. Binita Shah and Kevin WangW.T. Clarke High School, Vanguard“Where Do You Fit In?”3. Karen Papazian and Pavithran RavindranW.T. Clarke High School, Vanguard“Mr. Feggeler: Taking The Midwest By Storm!”FIRST AMENDMENT/FREEDOM OF SPEECH AWARD1. Madison FlotteronBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“To Stand Or Not To Stand…”2. Carolyn RogersShoreham-Wading River High School, Wildcat Pause“The Fight For Student Rights Continues”3. Gianna BarberiaHalf Hollow Hills High School West, The Roundup“Earning Equality: Let America Be America Again”GOVERNMENT – LOCAL1. Katie KontinoCommack High School, The Courant“Testing A New Method”2. Carly Lapidus and Nikki BerrinJericho High School, JerEcho“Where Did All The Baked Goods Go?”3. Keva LiGreat Neck North High School, The Guide Post“Grading The Teachers”GOVERNMENT – NATIONAL1. Emma La ReddolaCommack High School, The Courant“’Executive Order’ Orders Up Controversy”2. Alechia CacaceBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Fight Against ISIS Becomes Global”3. Claire NunezSmithtown High School East, The Matador“Foreign Relations: Close But No Cuban Cigar—Yet”HEADLINE – ENTERTAINMENT1. Sam NewmanJericho High School, JerEchoShrek Is An Ogre-Sized Success”2. Lester NetsNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“1989 Swiftly Rises To The Top”3. Amber BarneyBellport High School, The Clipper“Yoga Pants: A Boy’s Worst Nightmare”HEADLINE – EDITORIAL 1. Katie KonfinoCommack High School, The Courant“A Broken World”2. Shaheer IlyasNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“To Opt-out or Not To Opt-Out, That Is The Standardized Question”3. Gianna BarberiaHalf Hollow Hills High School West, The Roundup“Earning Equality: Let America Be America Again”HUMOR1. Gregory QuistSouthold High School, The Sentinel“Dale’s Dilemma”2. Kennedy RoseBellport High School, The Clipper“Clipper Prints Final Issue Ever”3. Josalie QuiwaHigh Hollow Hills High School West, The Roundup“Pedals Over Pastries”IN-DEPTH REPORTING1. Alejandro SerranoBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Non-Native Students Make Journey For Better Education, Life”2. Amber FarooqBay Shore High Shore, Maroon Echo“Despite Mirroring National Stats, AP/IB Lack Diversity Of School”3. Katie KonfinoCommack High School, The Courant“The 21st Century Dilemma”INFORMATIONAL FEATURE1. Alejandro SerranoBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Killing Oneself Now The Leading Cause Of Death Due To Injury”2. Alexandra NolanJericho High School, JerEcho“Students’ Opinions Are Sound On Texting And Driving”3. Evan HochhauserHalf Hollow Hills High School West, The Roundup“Paying For College Before You Can Even Start”ROBERT W. GREENE INVESTIGATIVE / ENTERPRISE REPORTING AWARD1. Alexandra EichensteinHalf Hollow Hills High School West, The Roundup“The Cheating Epidemic And What We’re (Not) Doing To Stop It”2. Amber FarooqBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Genetically Modified Organisms Creeping Way Into School Menu”3. Shaheer Ilyas and Roby DanielNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“SFT Contract Negotiations Continue”Honorable Mention. Julia SaccamanoSouthold High School, The Sentinel“It’s All About The Price Tag: The Unexpected Cost Of Your Future”MEDIA COLUMN1. Michelle LuJericho High School, JerEcho“YouTubers Succeed Beyond YouTube”2. Jenna BarboneSmithtown High School East, The Matador“iCloud Hacker Exposes Celebrities”NEWS STORY1. David MarquesMassapequa High School, The Chief“Too Few ‘Just Say No,’ LI Drug Problem Continues To Escalate”2. Katie KonfinoCommack High School, The Courant“The 21st Century Dilemma”3. Shaheer Iylas and Roby DanielNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“SFT Contract Negotiations Continue”OPINION – GENERAL1. Kevin McCannNorth Shore High School, Viking View“Origins Of Post-Modern Life”2. Kennedy RoseBellport High School, The Clipper“I Need A Hero”3. Andrew ScialloEast Islip High School, The Broadcaster“State Testing Could Determine Your Future”OPINION PIECE – NATIONAL1. Megan RodriguezW.T. Clarke High School, Vanguard“The Cost Of National Security”2. Christopher SumanoEast Islip High School, The Broadcaster“True Colors Of Racism”3. Jack LockwoodNorth Shore High School, Viking View“Gimme Three (Over) Steps”OPINION – POP CULTURE1. Collin GiulaniHalf Hollow Hills High School East, Thunderbird“Two Directions”2. Camila CabreraEast Islip High School, The Broadcaster“Entertainment Or Harassment?”3. Shannon Thomas and Fabiha KhalidNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Who’s The Boss?”OPINION PIECE – SCHOOL1. Alexandra EichensteinHalf Hollow Hills High School West, The Roundup“The Cheating Epidemic And What We’re (Not) Doing To Stop It”2. Jenna RudolfskyCalhoun High School, Hoofbeats“BYOI: Bring Your Own Ink”3. Mary DzyrNorth Shore High School, Viking View“What About US?”POLITICAL – LOCAL FEATURE 1. Stephanie ZelenetzNorth Shore High School, Viking View“The Ebola Hysteria Continues…On Long Island?”2. Marie Allen and Megan KonfinoCommack High School, The Courant“Keeping It On Long Island”3. Sarah QadirCommack High School, The Courant“Hometown Hero”POLITICAL – NATIONAL FEATURE 1. Gianna BarberiaHalf Hollow Hills High School West, The Roundup“Earning Equality: Let America Be America Again”2. Matthew Sheahan and Andre De LeonW.T. Clarke High School, Vanguard“ISIS: A Global Threat”3. Dorian PietraruNorth Shore High School, Viking View“A Chance For The Middle East”PROFILE1. Christina PanouisNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Thumbs Up For YasTube”2. Vishruth GirishNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot 
“All-Scrub To All-County”3. Teena ThomasNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The ChariotBrooke Cradin: Broadway Bound BiologistQ&A1. Ashley RadparvarGreat Neck North High School, Guide Post“Interview With Nobel Prize Winner – David Baltimore”2. Katie BurkeEast Islip High School, The Broadcaster“If You Could Take One Celebrity To Prom, Who Would It Be And Why?”3. Dennis Tavares and Matt WenkEast Islip High School, The Broadcaster“Ask Derek”Q&A – SCHOOL1. Jessica CarusoSmithtown East, The Matador“East Student’s East Asian Experience”2. Katie BurkeEast Islip High School, The Broadcaster“Who is One Teacher That Has Influenced Your Life and Why?”3. Karen Papazian and Pavithran RavindranW.T. Clarke High School, Vanguard“Mr. Feggeler: Taking the Midwest By Storm”REVIEW/CRITICISM 1. Eleni KothesakisNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt”2. Saumya SharmaNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Gotham Rises…Again”3. Sammi SteinJericho High School, JerEcho“’Orange’ Is Now Back”RELIGION/MULTICULTURAL 1. Isabel DeRanieri and Alishbah SaddiquiNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Rage Over Religion”2. Gianna BarberiaHalf Hollow Hills High School West, The Roundup“Earning Equality: Let America Be America Again3. Steven MolinaBellport High School, The Clipper“Students Can Make A Difference”SCHOOL – FEATURE1. Madison FlotteronBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Last Class To Remember 9/11 Will Graduate This Year”2. Teena ThomasNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“A Feud Worth Fighting For”3. Danielle AjodanGreat Neck North High School, Guide Post“A Taste of Hollywood: The Outskirts Shoot At North High”SCHOOL – NEWS1. Katie KonfinoCommack High School, The Courant“The 21st Century Dilemma”2. Michael BorelliEast Islip High School, The Broadcaster“High School Receives Unexpected Renovation”3. Julia LosnerCalhoun High School, Hoofbeats“New Field Trip Policy In Effect”SCHOOL – FINANCIAL NEWS 1. David MenarchemShoreham-Wading River High School, Wildcat Pause“Passing Bond Will Provide Much-Needed Improvements”2. Nelson GomezMassapequa High School, The Chief“District Debate Shifts From Budget To Declining Enrollment”3. Gabriel AjzenmanLynbrook High School, Horizon“BOE Discusses LHS Expansion”SCHOOL SPIRIT1. Katie KonfinoCommack High School, The Courant“Brotherhood Triumphs: CBVS Wins It All”2. Kalleigh ReganMassapequa High School, The Chief“Spirit Week”3. Emma CaseyBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Peer Support’s Awareness Weekend Celebrates 25 Years”SCHOOL CULTURE REPORTING 1. Nelson GomezMassapequa High School, The Chief“Questions On Diversity”2. Max SalitSyosset High School, The Pulse“Bathematics: Improving SHS Bathrooms”3. Krupa PatelNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Merry Hanakwanza”SCIENCE/HEALTH 1. Amber FarooqBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Genetically Modified Organisms Creeping Way Into School Menu”2. Christine CollinsCalhoun High School, Hoofbeats“Dispelling The Myth Of Ebola”3. Emily Budhram and Sara SalomonNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Concussions Cause Career-Ending Injuries”SOCIAL COMMENTARY – SCHOOL1. Alexandra EichensteinHalf Hollow Hills High School West, The Roundup“The Cheating Epidemic and What We’re (Not) Doing To Stop It”2. Kaitlyn LuceyMassapequa High School, The Chief“Redressing The Massapequa High School Dress Code”3. Sephora FerjusteHalf Hollow Hills High School West, The Roundup“Is Hills West A Safe Place To Come Out?”SOCIAL COMMENTARY – GENERAL 1. Nelson GomezMassapequa High School, The ChiefGarner, Brown Cases Raise Questions On Diversity At MHS”2. Christopher SumanoEast Islip High School, The Broadcaster“True Colors Of Racism In America”3. Kevin McCannNorth Shore High School, Viking View“The Origins Of Post-Modern Life”SERIOUS FEATURE1. Gianna BarberiaHalf Hollow Hills High School West, The Roundup“Earning Equality: Let America Be America Again”2. Carolyn RogersShoreham-Wading River High School, Wildcat Pause“The Truth Behind Sexual Harassment”3. Jake BlandiShoreham-Wading River High School, Wildcat Pause“Don’t Turn Your Head To Teen Violence”SOCIAL MEDIA ANALYSIS 1. Sarah ScanlonHalf Hollow Hills High School East, Thunderbird“Positives Of Social Media”2. Cassidy LathamShoreham-Wading River High School, Wildcat Pause“Meninism: Just A Joke Or A Serious Movement?”3. Nicholas PetrilloMassapequa High School, The Chief“Yak-Attack: Yik Yak App Stampedes Campuses Nationwide”SPORTS FEATURE1. Lizzy VolavkaBay Shoe High School, Maroon Echo“High School Athletes Suffer From Burnout, Too”2. James ColganNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“From Highlight Reel To Movie Reel”3. Vishruth GirishNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“All-Scrub To All-County”SPORTS – SCHOOL1. James ColganNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Spiking The Competition”2. Lizzy VolavkaBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“After 23 Years, Girls Lacrosse Coach Retires”3. Lindsay DieumgardBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Teams Rebuild After Seniors Graduate”SPORTS NATIONAL1. James ColganNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Picking Up The Pace”2. James ColganNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Pitchers Hooked On Tommy John”3. Matt SchwartzHalf Hollow Hills High School East, Thunderbird“Baltimore: Home Of America’s Comeback Team”STORYTELLING 1. Katie KonfinoCommack High School, The Courant“Brotherhood Triumphs: CBVS Wins It All”2. Jake NeedlemanSyosset High School, The Pulse“North Carolina To Sign Syosset Head Coach, John Calabria”3. Ben SenzerSyosset High School, The Pulse“Commotion In Student Government”STUDENT ISSUES 1. Danielle SchwartzNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Sweethearts Share Secrets To Success”2. Emily FlyerLynbrook High School, Horizon“What’s The Science Behind This One?”3. Amber BarneyBellport High School, The Clipper“Sadness Isn’t Pretty”STUDENT PROFILE 1. Vishruth GirishNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“All-Scrub To All-County”2. Christina PanouisNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Thumbs Up For YasTube”3. Kordell HammondBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“From Bay Shore To Broadway”TECHNOLOGY1. Sara Salomon and Emily BudhramNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Groundbreaking Lander Reaches New Heights”2. Marchella VerdiShoreham-Wading River High School“Technology Affects Teenage Brains”3. Alec Rich and Josh NouriyelianGreat Neck North High School, Guide Post“North High Implements Freshmen Year Curriculum And Technology Changes”TRAVEL1. Tyler Baron and Jaclyn WilliamsNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Gladiators Go Global”2. Michelle Furman and Aliyha GillEast Meadow High School, Jet Gazette“Amsterdam/London, Baby!”3. Steven MolinaBellport High School, The Clipper“Students Can Make A Difference”Honorable Mention. Antonia BentelPortledge School, Portledge Press“La Belle Vie En France” HERE’S THE COMPLETE LIST OF 2015 LONG ISLAND PRESS HIGH SCHOOL JOURNALISM AWARDS WINNERS:STORY OF THE YEARFIRST PLACE. Alexandra Eichenstein – Half Hollow Hills High School West, The Roundup“The Cheating Epidemic And What We’re (Not) Doing To Stop It”SECOND PLACE. Alejandro Serrano – Bay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Non-Native Students Make Journey For Better Education, Life”THIRD PLACE. Amber Merlini – Massapequa High School, The Chief“Right Gender, Wrong Body: Transgender Students In MHS”HONORABLE MENTION. Amber Farooq – Bay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Genetically Modified Organisms Creeping Way Into School Menu”STUDENT JOURNALIST OF THE YEARFIRST PLACE. Alejandro Serrano – Bay Shore High School, Maroon EchoSECOND PLACE. Nelson Gomez – Massapequa High School, The ChiefTHIRD PLACE. James Colgan – New Hyde Park Memorial High School, The ChariotHONORABLE MENTION. Katie Konfino – Commack High School, The CourantADVISOR OF THE YEARFIRST PLACE. Walt Fishon – Bay Shore High School, Maroon Echo (FOURTH YEAR IN A ROW)SECOND PLACE. Elyn Coyle – Massapequa High School, The ChiefTHIRD PLACE. Christina Semple – Commack High School, The CourantHONORABLE MENTION. Mike Stencel – New Hyde Park Memorial High School, The ChariotNEWSPAPER OF THE YEARFIRST PLACE. Bay Shore High School, Maroon EchoSECOND PLACE. Massapequa High School, The ChiefTHIRD PLACE. New Hyde Park Memorial High School, The ChariotHONORABLE MENTION. Commack High School, The Courant VIDEO AWARDSNEWS STORY1. Nick Albicocco, Ryan Kamber and Eric BrettJericho High School, JerEcho“Jericho Residents Blast New Speed Camera”2. David Schaeffler and Billy FrielingsdorfHauppauge High School, Eagle Watch“Forest Brook Elementary ALS Ice Bucket Challenge”3. Derek SemonHauppauge High School, Eagle Watch“Immigration Day”FEATURE STORY 1. Giulia MilanaJericho High School, JerEcho“Nicolas Vigliotti: One Year Later”2. Rachel HirschheimerJericho High School, JerEcho“Sweet Treats At Jericho’s Homecoming 2014”3. Dylan Rice and Dan NastaHauppauge High School, Eagle Watch“9/11 Memorial”SPORTS1. Nicolas Cecchini andJennifer HugHauppauge High School, Eagle Watch“Kicks For Cancer”ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT1. Katie Prudente 
Hauppauge High School, Eagle Watch“Inherit The Wind”2. Gianna BarberiaHalf Hollow Hills High School West, The Roundup“MoMA”3. Emma Casey and Chloe GuldeBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Page To Screen”SCHOOL SPIRIT1. Giulia Milana, Mikaela Adwar, Carly Lapidus, Sam Newman and Evan SilveraJericho High School, JerEcho“Lip Dub 2015”2. Gianna BarberiaHalf Hollow Hills High School West, The Roundup“End Of The Year Montage”3. Gianna BarberiaHalf Hollow Hills High School West, The Roundup“Homecoming 2014 Recap” ONLINE AWARDSONLINE – NEWS SITE1. JerEchoJericho High School2. The Chief OnlineMassapequa High School3. Guide Post OnlineGreat Neck North High SchoolONLINE – FEATURE1. Nelson GomezMassapequa High School, The Chief“New York Testing Procedures Face Increased Public Scrutiny”2. Alanna Levine andRachel HoffmanJericho High School, JerEcho“Minutes Away, Worlds Apart”3. Jenna BarboneSmithtown East High School, Smithtown Today News Online“‘The Dress’ Used To Address An Important Issue”ONLINE – PHOTO SERIES1. Amanda Damon, Carly Lapidus and Rebecca SimonJericho High School, JerEcho“Humans Of Jericho: Success Edition”2. Kalleigh ReganMassapequa High School, The Chief“Catch A Wave Shines Bright For A Cause”ONLINE – ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT1. Sam NewmanJericho High School, JerEcho“Newman’s Oscars”2. Tim KeuchlerMassapequa High School, The Chief“Taylor Swift’s Album ‘1989’ Arrives In Style”3. Kerry YoungMassapequa High School, The Chief“MHS Students Shine At The School’s Annual Express Night”ONLINE- EDITORIAL1. Rebecca SimonJericho High School, JerEcho“JPOV: Feminism Yesterday And Tomorrow” READ DAVID NORTH’S “LETTERS TO A YOUNG JOURNALIST” HEREInspiring words were delivered by Press/Morey Publishing Managing Editor Timothy Bolger, Press Senior Editor Spencer Rumsey, Press Staff/Education Reporter Jaime Franchi, Morey Publishing Sales Director John Meyers, New Media Director Michael Conforti and Graphic Designer Jon Chim, whose short but powerful remarks were sure to invoke at least a few starry eyes from those in attendance, as they did at last year’s gala.“Art and design are critical components of a truly great story,” declared Chim while introducing the “Newspaper Design/Illustration & Headline” category and several winners. “Photographs and masterful illustrations can elevate any article and make them works of art in themselves. Exceptional design work can streamline a story, directing the readers’ eyes and hearts to its most impactful and emotional elements.”“A great news story is not merely an account of how, what, where, when and why,” explained [#Tomothy] Bolger as he introduced the winners for “Best News Story.” “Yes, it contains all of those elements, but a great news story is truly so much more. A great news story captivates the reader from the first syllable. A great news story shows both sides of the issue. A great news story leaves no stone unturned, serves to inform and incite, and is a catalyst of meaningful reflection and action.“A great news story affects people,” he continued. “It is a public service.”Special awards were dedicated to Aura Diaz, the 16-year-old mother from Brentwood who was murdered in 2005 and Andrea Rebello, the 21-year-old Hofstra junior who tragically lost her life in a shooting two years ago.Twarowski presented the contest’s Robert W. Greene Investigative / Enterprise Journalism Award—named in honor of two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning investigative journalist Robert “Bob” Greene, who besides being a force of nature in the field, was also a powerhouse for good in the classroom and a longtime teacher at the university. The legendary Newsday editor was also instrumental in founding Hofstra University’s journalism and communication programs.“One of the things I love most about journalism is its power to illuminate,” he proclaimed. “To give voice to the voiceless. To shine a light on all the dark places. That’s what investigative journalism does, and here at Hofstra once taught one of the very best of the craft.”“These writers and stories embody Bob Greene’s spirit, his passion, his quest for the truth,” he added. NEWSPAPER DESIGN/ILLUSTRATION & HEADLINECARTOON1. Priyanka AlguNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“To Opt Out Or Not To Opt Out”2. Priyanka AlguNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Who’s The Boss”3. Priyanka AlguNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“NHP Celebrates Local Heroes”CARTOON – ENTERTAINMENT 1. Fabio RiveraW.T. Clarke High School, Vanguard“Fabio’s Corner”2. Michael DonderoEast Islip High School, The Broadcaster“Why Must We Always Wait?”3. Michael DonderoEast Islip High School, The Broadcaster“Growing Up In The Spotlight”CARTOON – POLITICAL 1. Priyanka AlguNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“To Opt Out Or Not To Opt Out”2. Priyanka AlguNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“Who’s The Boss?”3. Michael DonderoEast Islip High School, The Broadcaster“Running On Dunkin’”CARTOON/SCHOOL ILLUSTRATION 1. Priyanka AlguNew Hyde Park Memorial High School, The Chariot“To Opt Out Or Not To Opt Out”2. Nicole NunezBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“DC Vs. Marvel”3. Arianna ScavoneJericho High School, JerEcho“Wonderful World”FEATURE DESIGN 1. Kalleigh Regan, Brandan Lawrence and Nelson GomezMassapequa High School, The Chief“My Fair Lady”2. Amber FarooqBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Food Fight”3. Julia SaccamanoSouthold High School, The Sentinel“Teachers’ Extracurricular Activities”FEATURE HEADLINE 1. Sarah QadirCommack High School, The Courant“I’m Geeking Out”2. Andrea ParedesBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“You Better Bee-lieve it: Bee Population Is Declining”3. Clare WalterEast Islip High School, The Broadcaster“Seniors: The Most ‘Common’ Way To APPly”LAYOUT/SECTION 1. Kalleigh Regan, Brandan Lawrence and Nelson GomezMassapequa High School, The Chief“My Fair Lady”2. Nelson GomezMassapequa High School, The Chief“Spirit Week”3. Nicole Nunez and Lindsey DieumegardBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Maroon Echo Sports”LAYOUT/FRONT COVER1. Julia SaccamanoSouthold High School, The Sentinel“Shaving Cream Contest”2. Editorial Board – Katie KonfinoCommack High School, The Courant“November 2014 – Special Issue”3. Amber FarooqBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Maroon Echo Front Page”LAYOUT/OVERALL1. Guide Post StaffGreat Neck North High School, Guide Post“March 2015”2. Hoofbeats StaffCalhoun High School, Hoofbeats“April 2015 Issue”3. Kevin WangW.T. Clarke High School, Vanguard“February 2015: Issue II”NEWS DESIGN1. Graelin MandelGreat Neck North High School, Guide Post“News Section March 2015”2. Editorial Board – Katie KontinoCommack High School, The Courant“November 2014 Cover – Special Issue”3. Editorial Board – Anna TobinCommack High School, The Courant“News, Page 3”NEWS HEADLINE1. Brandan LawrenceMassapequa High School, The Chief“Are the Students Livin’ It Up In The Hotel Massapequa?”2. Amber FarooqBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“How Do You Like Them Apples?”3. Megan KontinoCommack High School, The Courant“Double The Trouble”NEWS ILLUSTRATION1. Solomon AguirreBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Teen Sleep Deprivation Rates Increasing”2. Alejandro SerranoBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Suicide”3. Yolanda HernandezBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“The Death Of The Teen Flick”ORIGINAL ILLUSTRATION1. Emily RosenbergHalf Hollow Hills High School East, Thunderbird“2014 High School East Student Film Festival”2. Juliane Van GordenSouthold High School, The Sentinel“Winter Fashion”3. Melita HowellShoreham-Wading River High School, Wildcat Pause“From Student To Jail Bird: My Trip To The County Jail”PHOTO ESSAY1. Kalleigh Regan and Nelson GomezMassapequa High School, The Chief“Spirit Week”2. Alexandra Nolan and Gabby GartenJericho High School, JerEcho“Park At Your Own Risk”3. Amber Farooq and Tommy LinaresBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“A Spirited Bunch”PHOTOGRAPHY/SERIES1. Karen Papazian and Pavithran RavindranW.T. Clarke High School, Vanguard“Mr. Feggeler: Taking The Midwest By Storm!”2. Kalleigh ReganMassapequa High School, The Chief“Roving Reporter: MHS Weighs In On New Lanyard Policy”3. Lily SaeliSouthold High School, The Sentinel“Spirit Day”LAYOUT/SINGLE PAGE – SCHOOL1. Avani SinghW.T. Clarke High School, Vanguard“Humans Of Clarke”2. Karen Papazian and Pavithran RavindranW.T. Clarke High School, Vanguard“Mr. Feggeler: Taking The Midwest By Storm!”3. Nicole NunezBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Injuries On The Field”LAYOUT/SINGLE PAGE – GENERAL1. Julia Kaluta and Julia MargalitGreat Neck North High School, Guide Post“Tips And Tricks To An Organized Day”2. Sam Berger and Brandon DiazEast Meadow High School, Jet Gazette“Sports”3. Kevin RosandEast Islip High School, The Broadcaster“February Issue, Page 5”SINGLE PHOTO1. Joseph WoryszSouthold High School, The Sentinel“Southold’s Spirit Day Shaving Cream War”2. Kalleigh ReganMassapequa High School, The Chief“A New Epidemic?”3. Tommy LinaresBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“To Stand Or Not To Stand…”GRAPHIC ART1. Nicole NunezBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“AP/IB Lack Diversity”2. Carolyn RogersShoreham-Wading River High School, Wildcat Pause“The Truth Behind Sexual Harassment”3. Nelson Gomez, Kalleigh Regan and Brandan LawrenceMassapequa High School, The Chief“My Fair Lady”SPORTS PHOTO1. Alicia RendaDivision Avenue High School, Dragon Tales“Swim Team Goes Undefeated”2. Skyler KesslerLynbrook High School, Horizon“Raymond Farrell High Jump”3. Nicole NunezBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Softball Pitcher”NEWSPAPER SPECIAL SECTIONS AWARDSSPORTS 1. Katie KonfinoCommack High School, The Courant“November 2014 Special Issue Wrap Around”2. Danielle Ajodan and Won JungGreat Neck North High School, Guide Post“Sports November 2014”3. Lindsay DieumgardBay Shore High School, Maroon Echo“Maroon Echo Sports”OPEN CATEGORY1. Katie KontinoCommack High School, The Courant“Freshman Survival Guide”2. Amber Merlini, Jacqueline Rapisardi, Danielle Anzelone, Jillian Hand and Kaitlyn LuceyMassapequa High School, The Chief“Gender Issues”SPECIAL ISSUE – MAGAZINE1. Great Neck North High School, Guide Post“200th Anniversary Guide Post Special Edition: Great Neck North High School – Throughout The Years – 1929 And Beyond”last_img read more

Fintech makes any day payday for cash-strapped consumers

first_imgWaiting for your paycheck is so 2010. A wave of fintech companies is changing the traditional pay cycle, allowing people to tap into money earned before the next payday. It’s another example of how money management and movement are transforming, driven by advances in technology, a shifting economy and changing consumer expectations.How people get paid is changing in step with changes in how many people work. As part of the gig economy, independent workers connect directly to customers through platforms like Uber, Airbnb and Etsy. A growing number of people earn money from other short-term engagements, freelance work and on-demand roles. No matter the job, including traditional employment, workers crave greater flexibility and fewer constraints than ever before.And many of them need it. While nearly two-thirds of Americans are paid biweekly, sometimes waiting for the next paycheck is problematic, whatever a person’s income. Half of millennials (and 38 percent of all consumers) say it would be difficult or even impossible for them to pay back a loan of $500 right now, according to recent Fiserv research. continue reading » 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Negro Leagues’ 100th anniversary: Remembering the legacy of Bud Fowler

first_imgFowler continued to play baseball until African-Americans were banned from playing on all-white teams. “Shortly after that he formed an all-black team, that was in 1895,” said Binghamton baseball historian Jim Maggiore. That team was the Page Fence Giants, where Fowler finished his career before returning to Binghamton to retire. Fowler was the first African American to play organized professional baseball. Born in Cooperstown, Broome County Historian Roger Luther said he made his way to Binghamton at the age of nine. Fowler was known as a pitcher and second baseman. He jumped from team to team but in 1887 Roger said Fowler found his way home. “That made him the very first African-American to sign with a baseball team,” said Luther. Luther said Fowler’s teammates signed a letter citing the team’s refusal to play if he was a member of the Bingos. That was the end of Fowler’s brief baseball career in Binghamton. “The reason was his teammates did not liking having an African-American on their baseball team,” said Luther. BINGHAMTON (WBNG) – As Major League Baseball honors the 100th anniversary of the Negro Leagues, Bud Fowler’s legacy is remembered in Binghamton. Despite being one of the best players on the team, the then 30 year-old didn’t make it through one full season back in his hometown. Fowler has been recognized by the National Baseball Hall of Fame, which named the street leading up to the famous Doubleday Field “Fowler Way.” Fowler died in 1913 in Frankfurt, New York. He leaves a legacy that is still shown in the major leagues. Luther said he stopped playing baseball in 1900, and moved back to Binghamton where he then ran a barbershop on Washington Street. “He joined the Bingo’s, the Binghamton baseball team,” said Luther. As a teenager, he signed with a professional baseball team in Pennsylvania. Fowler’s barbershop was in the building downtown now known as “Craft.”last_img read more

Pandemic’s impact won’t be clear until 2021

first_img– Advertisement – – Advertisement – “I would have thought in the beginning (of the pandemic) in spring that we might see the first real impact on balance sheets in the third or fourth quarter of this year,” she told CNBC’s Annette Weisbach on Monday.However, König highlighted that some government support implemented at the start of the coronavirus crisis was starting to expire, and as such, further damage to Europe’s banking sector could become apparent later in 2021.“Until the dust has settled a bit I would expect we will see it (a rise in NPLs) in the third and second quarters of next year … Let’s be clear, this is a unique situation,” she said.- Advertisement – An empty street in Amsterdam during the government-imposed lockdown due to the coronavirus pandemic.SOPA Images | LightRocket | Getty Imagescenter_img The fallout from the coronavirus pandemic on Europe’s financial institutions will become more apparent in the coming months, according to a senior European banking official, and there could be one or two casualties in the sector.Elke König, chair of the Single Resolution Board of the Single Resolution Mechanism, which oversees the restructuring of failing banks in the EU, said she expected a rise in the number of non-performing loans (NPLs) in the region, which in turn would hit bank balance sheets.When these loans could peak, however, was the “$60,000 dollar question,” König said.- Advertisement – She stressed that it was not all a “doom scenario,” however, adding: “We will see NPLs but we will also see other industries doing great.”“We have clearly stated that banks should stay ready, should be reasonable and have their risk management up to date. As soon as they address an emerging problem, the better,” König said.The purpose of the Single Resolution Mechanism is to ensure the orderly resolution (or winding-down) of failing banks in the region.The SRM came into being in 2014 after the 2008/2009 financial crisis and subsequent euro zone sovereign debt crisis. A key element in the SRM is the Single Resolution Fund, financed by contributions from the banking sector, to help wind down failing banks, and to shore up the whole financial system.The SRM is seen as a key pillar of the euro zone’s banking union (although other EU countries can join), alongside the Single Supervisory Mechanism. The latter gives the European Central Bank supervisory powers over the region’s banking institutions to check they comply with European banking rules, meet capital requirements and are not vulnerable to collapse.Asked whether she expected to see some bank failures given the end of support measures, König said she was “mildly optimistic that we will not see a wave of bank failures.”“Why am I mildly optimistic? The ECB did their (vulnerability) analysis, others did similar stress tests, they show that after the financial crisis, banks’ balance sheets have been cleaned up and beefed up (and) have more and better capital, so on average we can weather this kind of storm,” she saidNonetheless, she added that “you can never rule out the one or the other failure. Banks that have been fairly weak going in may not come out stronger.”last_img read more

What is the average price of renting an apartment in Croatia?

first_imgThe largest offer of apartments is in Crikvenica, Rab and Pula. The average price of an apartment in Crikvenica in the season is 66 euros, while on Rab it is 65 euros per day. In Pula, you will have to pay an average of 75 euros for a day of rent, while in Rijeka the rent is cheaper by about 10 euros. According to the data at their disposal, the average price of renting a tourist apartment out of season is on average 46 euros, which is 31 percent cheaper than in season. South Dalmatia There are currently more than 150 ads for rent in Njuškalo in this region. Prices range from 60 to more than 150 euros. Along with Dubrovnik, where the average daily rental price of apartments in the season is 77 euros at the level of the entire city, most apartments are offered in Orebic and Korcula. The average daily rental price of an apartment in Orebic is 67 euros, while on Korcula it is 54 euros. Portal Njuškalo.hr in accordance with the ads on their platform, ie on the basis of more than 6 thousand holiday facilities on the coast and inland, they made an overview of domestic holiday destinations and received a calculation of the average rental price of apartments. There are several types of tourist accommodation, most of which are apartments, but you can also find whole houses and rooms. Prices range from around 20 euros to as much as 500 euros per day of rental. Most apartments from this region are offered in Vodice, Zadar, Vir and Biograd na Moru. The average price of renting an apartment in Zadar in the season is 64 euros per day, while in Biograd na Moru it is 65 euros. The average daily rental price of apartments in Vir in the season is 57 euros, while in Vodice it is 5 euros higher, or 62 euros. Makarska Riviera / Photo: Sandro Music / FB Central Dalmatia In this region, apartments can be found for about 40 euros per day, but the average price is 73 euros. Most apartments are offered in Split, Makarska and Omis. Although an overnight stay can be found for around one euro, the average daily rental price of a tourist apartment in Split in the season is 86 euros, which is about 3 euros more than in Makarska. In Omis, the average daily rental price of a tourist apartment is 77 euros. Finally, one interesting thing. As they point out from Njuškalo, there are more and more foreign visitors in this category, and most of them are from Germany, Slovenia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and Austria. Source: Njuškalo.hr The category Tourism is growing month by month, so in June it had as much as 70 percent more visits than in the previous month, but also 6 percent more than in June last year, they point out from Njuškalo, which is not surprising since it is our peak tourist season at the door. More than 2.700 accommodation facilities in Northern Dalmatia are currently available on Njuškalo. Apartments in this region record the best prices in the season, if we compare them with other coastal regions. Source: Njuškalo.hr middle Dalmatia Source: Njuškalo.hr Despite the above, in many places in this region you can rent an apartment for as little as thirty euros per day. In Pag, the average daily price of renting an apartment in the season is 60 euros, while in nearby Novalja, known primarily for the beach Zrce, the price is about 30 percent higher and amounts to 78 euros. Some of the more favorable places for holidays in Northern Dalmatia are Tribunj, Pirovac and Vrsi, where the average daily rental prices of apartments range from 50 to 55 euros. When looking at the regions, the highest prices for renting a tourist apartment are in Central Dalmatia, where the average price is 79 euros per day. Rental prices, on an annual basis, grew in all coastal regions, from 2 to 8 percent. Istria, Kvarner and Primorje  According to NJuškalo.hr, the average daily rental price of a tourist apartment in Croatia (on Njuškalo) in the season is 67 euros, which is 4 euros more than last year Northern Dalmatia The largest offer of private tourist accommodation is in Northern Dalmatia, Kvarner and Primorje Source: Njuškalo.hrlast_img read more